Leaving No One Behind: How Far on the Way to Universal Primary and Secondary Education?

With the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), countries have promised to achieve universal completion of primary and secondary education by 2030. This paper, jointly released by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report, illustrates the magnitude of this challenge. Globally, 263 million children, adolescents and youth between the ages of 6 and 17 are currently out of school, according to a new set of UIS indicators.

Monitoring the Right to Education of Out-of-School Girls in Tanzania

Tanzania has one of the highest child marriage rates in the world. According to the UN Population Fund, 37% of girls are married by age eighteen. In Tanzania, as in many other countries, child marriage usually means the end of a girls’ education. Girls are forced to drop-out of school or else don’t progress to secondary school.

Date: 
25 July 2016

Sri Lanka Supreme Court - Access to education of people living with HIV/AIDS

"The Court would like to place on record that in terms of Article 27(2)(h) of the Constitution it is one of the directive principles of state policy to ensure the right to universal and equal access to education at all levels. The Court also wishes to place on record that the state should ensure that the human rights of the people living with HIV/AIDS are promoted, protected and respected and measures to be taken to eliminate discrimination against them"

The Right to Education: Scope and Implementation; General Comment 13 on the Right to Education, Article 13 of the ICESCR

"Achieving the right to education for all is one of the biggest challenges of our times. The second International Development Goal addresses this challenge: universalizing primary education in all countries by 2015. This is also one of the main objectives set at the World Education Forum (April 2000), where the right to basic education for all was reaffirmed as a fundamental human right.

Significance of the Convention against Discrimination in Education

"In our globalized world, education and the fight against discrimination remains a major issue. Thus discriminatory practices still exist today despite the fact that discrimination has no justification in international law.

Faced with this challenge, not only is education required to play an important role in the fight against discrimination, but access to all levels of education must be ensured systematically and without discrimination. This is one of the major issues involved in the right to education."

Combating Discrimination in Education: Guidelines for the Preparation of Reports, Ninth Consultation of Member States on the Application of the Convention and Recommendation Against Discrimination in Education

These Guidelines are intended to assist Member States in the preparation of the Reports on the implementation of the 1960 Convention against Discrimination in Education (“the Convention”) as well as the 1960 Recommendation against Discrimination in Education (“the Recommendation”). The Convention and the Recommendation, adopted by UNESCO’s General Conference in 1960, correspond to UNESCO’s constitutional mandate to “advance the ideal of equality of educational opportunities without regard to race, sex or any distinctions, economic or social”.

Separate and Unequal: School Funding in ‘Post-Racial’ America

In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a public school funding system based primarily on local property tax revenues does not violate the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause nor does it violate the right to education because, although education is an ‘important service’ it is not a fundamental right, as recognised by the U.S. Constitution.

Date: 
12 January 2016

Roma Early Childhood Inclusion: Special Report on Roma Inclusion in Early Childhood Education and Care

This report consists of three main chapters. The first chapter enumerates all the mechanisms contributing to the development of educational inequalities in the Czech Republic’s education system, which are summarised to provide a context for the focus of this report—the ECEC of Roma children.

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