Lifelong learning from a social justice perspective

Over the past two decades, a set of globally converging discourses on lifelong learning (LLL) has emerged around the world. Driven mostly by inter-governmental organisations, these discourses have been largely embraced by national and local education systems seeking to reflect local traditions and priorities. This paper argues that these discourses tend to look remarkably alike, converging into a homogeneous rationale in which the economic dimension of education predominates over other dimensions of learning, and in which adaptation takes pre-eminence

Realising the right to education through non-formal education

The Special Rapporteur believes that non-formal education programmes provide flexible, learner-centred means to improve education outcomes. This is particularly relevant for girls and groups in vulnerable situations, including children with disabilities, minorities and rural and impoverished children, who are disproportionately represented among out-of-school populations. When designed to be available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable, such programmes enable states to fulfil the right to education of learners who are excluded from the formal system.

Report of the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education: Lifelong learning

The present report, submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolutions 8/4 and 26/17, is devoted to lifelong learning and the right to education. The Special Rapporteur sheds light on the vision and concept of lifelong learning and highlights the emergence of the 'right to learning', intertwined with the right to education and training as a social right. He also examines state responsibility, along with that of other social partners, for its realisation and underlines the key importance placed on lifelong learning in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Dichotomy of technical vs. general education: Challenging the indivisibility of the right to education

I was very pleased to be invited by UNESCO to participate in the Asia Pacific Conference on Education and Training (ACET) that took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from August 3 to 5. It was organized jointly by UNESCO and the Ministry of Education, Malaysia, with participation from 48 countries. The timing of the Conference couldn’t have been better, right after the World Education Forum in May and before the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Summit in September.

Date: 
18 August 2015

State of the world's minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2009: Events of 2008 - Education special

In a unique collaboration with UNICEF, Minority Rights Group International reports on what minority and indigenous children around the world face in their struggle to learn. This report profiles the programmes that are being developed to help them – from better bilingual education to meeting the needs of nomadic populations – giving examples of what works and why. It describes efforts to overcome exclusion so that education is available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable for minorities and indigenous peoples, and shows how far there is still to go.

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