Accountability in education: Meeting our commitments (2017-8 youth version)

SDG 4, right to education, global education monitoring report, sustainable development goals

This youth report, based on findings and conclusions from the 2017/8 Global Education Monitoring report, asks how young people are involved in the process of accountability in education. As students, what are we responsible for in our education and how are we held accountable? How can we make sure other actors–like schools, universities and governments–are held accountable for their responsibilities?

Literacy from a right to education perspective

This paper was commissioned by the Section for Basic Education for the Final Evaluation of the Implementation of the International Plan of Action for the United Nations Literacy Decade
(UNLD): Education for All as background information to assist in drafting the Report of the Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization to be
submitted to the UN General Assembly at its 68th session. It explores literacy from a human rights perspective.

The Global Literacy Challenge: A profile of youth and adult literacy at the mid-point of the United Nations Literacy Decade 2003 – 2012

The publication examines the many dimensions of youth and adult literacy set in the context of development and shows how it connects with other societal challenges such as gender equality, and poverty reduction. Although literacy is at the core of the Education for All goals, three-quarters of the 127 countries for which projections were calculated will miss the target of halving adult illiteracy rates by 2015; moreover, the literacy gender gap is closing too slowly: 63 per cent of illiterate adults were women in 1985-1994, compared to 64 per cent in 2000-2006.

Literacy for life

The EFA Global Monitoring Report 2006 aims to shine a stronger policy spotlight on the more neglected goal of literacy - a foundation not only for achieving EFA but, more broadly, for reaching the overarching goal of reducing human poverty.

Lifelong learning from a social justice perspective

Over the past two decades, a set of globally converging discourses on lifelong learning (LLL) has emerged around the world. Driven mostly by inter-governmental organisations, these discourses have been largely embraced by national and local education systems seeking to reflect local traditions and priorities. This paper argues that these discourses tend to look remarkably alike, converging into a homogeneous rationale in which the economic dimension of education predominates over other dimensions of learning, and in which adaptation takes pre-eminence

Realising the right to education through non-formal education

The Special Rapporteur believes that non-formal education programmes provide flexible, learner-centred means to improve education outcomes. This is particularly relevant for girls and groups in vulnerable situations, including children with disabilities, minorities and rural and impoverished children, who are disproportionately represented among out-of-school populations. When designed to be available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable, such programmes enable states to fulfil the right to education of learners who are excluded from the formal system.

Report of the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education: Lifelong learning

The present report, submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolutions 8/4 and 26/17, is devoted to lifelong learning and the right to education. The Special Rapporteur sheds light on the vision and concept of lifelong learning and highlights the emergence of the 'right to learning', intertwined with the right to education and training as a social right. He also examines state responsibility, along with that of other social partners, for its realisation and underlines the key importance placed on lifelong learning in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Pages