Institutional Autonomy and the Protection of Higher Education from Attack

This study examines the relationship between institutional autonomy and the security of higher education institutions from violent and coercive attacks. The paper includes a review of the limited literature available, as well as a series of examples illustrating different forms of attacks. These include arrests related to classroom content in Zimbabwe, sectarian divisions in Iraq, impunity for murders of academics in Pakistan, and physical intimidation on campuses in Tunisia. The study suggests that institutional autonomy plays a direct and indirect protective function.

Privatisation of Education and the Right to Education

This article discusses the privatisation of education from a human rights perspective. It focuses on what international human rights law in general, and the right to education in particular has to say with respect to the operation and consequences of privatisation in the area of education. The article reviews the content of the right to education and makes observations on the relationship between privatisation and violations of obligations resulting from the right to education. It provides a definition of the privatisation of education and an analysis of potential human rights issues.

Human Rights and Privatisation

This document considers the State's obligations, and how they translate in the context of economic, social and cultural Rights, including the right to education (derived from the four key principles of equality and non-discrimination; indivisibility and interdependence of rights; accountability; and participation); Responsibilities of Non-State Actors, including Companies; and, Amnesty International's Human Rights Principles Concerning Delivery of Essential Services.

 

Using Human Rights Standards to Assess Privatisation of Education in Africa

According to international law, States have the principal responsibility ‘to ensure the direct provision of the right to education in most circumstances.  Although private education is allowed under international law, there are specific conditions and limitations under which private education must operate.  While empirical data about the effectiveness of public and private schools is needed to inform the debate on how to achieve quality education, there also needs to be criteria to assess the measures for determining ‘effectiveness’ and to define what models of private education are ac

Monitoring the Right to Education for Refugees, Migrants and Asylum Seekers

This article is based on a year-long study of the right to education for child refugees and migrants from other African countries who find themselves in South Africa. It identifies a number of factors that inhibit children’s participation in education and shows how the right to education can be assessed and monitored using indicators.

Learning in Displacement: Briefing paper on the right to education of internally displaced people

This paper introduces a series of case studies looking at education for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs). It examines the international human rights law framework for guaranteeing education to IDPs, focusing on issues such as non-discrimination and documentation that are particularly likely to arise in this context.

Human Rights: Promoting Gender Equality in and through Education

The Dakar Framework for Action represents the most important international political commitment towards promoting Education for All. The Framework contains two gender-based goals. In Article 7 (ii) the participants commit themselves to eliminating "gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005". The second commitment is to achieve gender equality in education (Article 7 (v)). These are described as "gender parity" and "gender equality" respectively.

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