This online library provides resources from the Right to Education Project as well as from other partner organisations. You can filter relevant resources by topic, region, country, content type and language. Note that resources in other languages will be available soon.

See also our list of useful databases for information on the implementation of the right to education at national level.

The Education for All (EFA) movement is a global commitment to provide quality basic education for all children, youth and adults. At the World Education Forum (Dakar, 2000), 164 governments pledged to achieve EFA and identified six goals to be met by 2015. Governments, development agencies, civil society and the private sector are working together to reach the EFA goals.

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The fifth edition of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI 05)) entitled 'Domestic Financing: Tax and Education' aims to analyse tax justice and domestic resource mobilization, with a special focus on the global South.

NSI 05 consists of 25 articles which aim to highlight global and national-level experiences and perspectives. It calls for greater attention to issues that influence national resource capacities for education and how that funding may be used. Questions of financing education are even more pressing as we face the consequences of Covid-19 and the impact of lockdowns globally. This pandemic is radically changing school attendance and learning, as well as the amount of education spending available from a diminished tax base.

The issue is composed of six sections that showcase global perspectives as well as local case studies, discussing the links between tax justice and domestic financing for education from different standpoints. 

  • Part one features global perspectives on tax and education, why tax matters — particularly in times of a global health crisis — and the role of international instruments and actors.
  • Part two sheds light on progressive and regressive national tax reforms with specific case studies from Ghana, India and Pakistan.
  • Part three salutes local movements and activism to reform tax for equitable education provision.
  • Part four calls for global reforms and greater attention to the impacts of corporations and philanthropic actors on tax justice.
  • Part five addresses concerns regarding the increasing trend of privatization of education, illustrated by three case studies from the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Uganda
  • Part six outlines the social movements and struggles surrounding education and tax.

Chapter 3 focuses on the obligations under international human rights law to resources public education through taxes.

NSI 05’s guest editor, David Archer, is Head of Civic Participation, Tax Justice and Public Services at ActionAid (UK), and holds extensive experience in education. He co-founded the Global Campaign for Education, is the Board Chair of the Right to Education Initiative, Chair of the Strategy and Impact Committee of the Global Partnership for Education and is a trustee of the UK Education and Development Forum (UKFIET).

The fifth edition of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI 05)) entitled 'Domestic Financing: Tax and Education' aims to analyse tax justice and domestic resource mobilization, with a special focus on the global South.

NSI 05 consists of 25 articles which aim to highlight global and national-level experiences and perspectives. It calls for greater attention to issues that influence national resource capacities for education and how that funding may be used. Questions of financing education are even more pressing as we face the consequences of Covid-19 and the impact of lockdowns globally. This pandemic is radically changing school attendance and learning, as well as the amount of education spending available from a diminished tax base.

The issue is composed of six sections that showcase global perspectives as well as local case studies, discussing the links between tax justice and domestic financing for education from different standpoints. 

  • Part one features global perspectives on tax and education, why tax matters — particularly in times of a global health crisis — and the role of international instruments and actors.
  • Part two sheds light on progressive and regressive national tax reforms with specific case studies from Ghana, India and Pakistan.
  • Part three salutes local movements and activism to reform tax for equitable education provision.
  • Part four calls for global reforms and greater attention to the impacts of corporations and philanthropic actors on tax justice.
  • Part five addresses concerns regarding the increasing trend of privatization of education, illustrated by three case studies from the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Uganda
  • Part six outlines the social movements and struggles surrounding education and tax.

Chapter 3 focuses on the obligations under international human rights law to resources public education through taxes.

NSI 05’s guest editor, David Archer, is Head of Civic Participation, Tax Justice and Public Services at ActionAid (UK), and holds extensive experience in education. He co-founded the Global Campaign for Education, is the Board Chair of the Right to Education Initiative, Chair of the Strategy and Impact Committee of the Global Partnership for Education and is a trustee of the UK Education and Development Forum (UKFIET).

This report considers international research on the impact of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provision upon children's development, using studies reported from a wide range of sources including journals, books, government reports and diverse organisation reports. 

 

The report analyses the ways in which unpaid care work is recognised and organised, the extent and quality of care jobs and their impact on the well-being of individuals and society. A key focus of this report is the persistent gender inequalities in households and the labour market, which are inextricably linked with care work. These gender inequalities must be overcome to make care work decent and to ensure a future of decent work for both women and men. The report contains a wealth of original data drawn from over 90 countries and details transformative policy measures in five main areas: care, macroeconomics, labour, social protection and migration. It also presents projections on the potential for decent care job creation offered by remedying current care work deficits and meeting the related targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Case study of Argentinian Superior Tribunal of Justice litigation settlement related to the case of ACIJ v the City of Buenos Aires. Though the Constitution of the City of Buenos Aires establishes a duty for the city government to provide all children over 45 days old with access to education, since at least 2002 thousands of children were denied early education. Civil society organisation ACIJ successfully used budget analysis and strategic litigation to pressure the city government to meet its obligation to its children.

 
 

These Guidelines set out principles for the promotion of decent work for early childhood education (ECE) personnel as a means of ensuring universal access to high-quality ECE services. In this respect they cover conditions of work and employment of ECE personnel and related issues, including ECE financing, curricula and learning practices, social security, professional ethics and ECE governance systems. The Guidelines are meant to serve as a reference tool on principles that should be reflected in the design and implementation of ECE measures such as policies, strategies, legislation, administrative measures and social dialogue mechanisms, including collective bargaining agreements. The Guidelines can be implemented progressively to achieve their objectives so as to take account of different national settings, cultures, and social, economic and political contexts.

 
 

This is a background paper prepared for the International Forum on inclusion and equity in education – every learner matters, held in Cali, Colombia in September 2019. Its objectives are to outline the rationale for working on inclusive early childhood care and education (ECCE) for the promotion of inclusion and equity, and to analyse the trends, achievements and challenges concerning inclusive ECCE.

 
 

This paper outlines the rationale for focusing new attention on the educational needs of young children living in fragile conditions is strong: there is a broad body of scientific evidence; the international legal framework of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child asserts that all children have the right to health, education, legal registration, and protection from violence and separation from parents, beginning at birth; and the Sustainable Development Goals for all will be not reached without a focus on the earliest years of life in crisis and conflict situations. It presents the case for increased attention and investment in early childhood in conflict and crisis contexts, with focused attention on early learning and family support.

 

 

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