This online library provides resources from the Right to Education Project as well as from other partner organisations. You can filter relevant resources by topic, region, country, content type and language. Note that resources in other languages will be available soon.

See also our list of useful databases for information on the implementation of the right to education at national level.

Global Education Monitoring Report (GEM Report) has produced a summary of content related to disability and education from their reports dating back to 2010. This summary provides background to those aiming to take part in the ongoing online consultation for the 2020 GEM Report on inclusion and education.

The summary gives ten key messages with accompanying evidence:

  1. Most countries have committed to protect the right to education for people with disabilities, which offers a basis for accountability.
  2. But assessing compliance with this right is complicated by blurred definitions and a lack of monitoring mechanisms.
  3. Organizations of persons with disabilities, as well as families and communities, can play a significant role in monitoring country commitments to the right to education.
  4. There is a lack of concrete data showing the true scale of disabilities worldwide and its link to education, although this should improve soon.
  5. We know that marginalization is more acute for children with disabilities.
  6. A relatively larger share of children with disabilities live in poorer countries.
  7. Children with disabilities are less likely to attend and complete primary school
  8. Those with disabilities are more likely to be without basic literacy skills
  9. Disability intersects with other disadvantages to exacerbate children’s disadvantage.
    • Poverty is both a potential cause and a consequence of disability
    • Girls and those in conflict with disabilities can be especially vulnerable.
  10. Different disabilities create very different education-related challenges

The summary also lists ten recommendations on education policies highlighted in previous GEM Reports as being able to counteract marginalization caused by disabilities:

  1. Governments should fulfil Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities commitments to set up mechanisms for coordination, independent monitoring, enforcement, complaint and reparation.
  2. Measuring progress in education for children with disabilities requires also having measures based on nationally representative household surveys, rather than only on children who are in school.
  3. Governments should develop inclusive curricula to help break down barriers faced by children with disabilities in the classroom.
  4. Separating children from their peers or families is detrimental to their development and potential.
  5. Teachers must be supported with training and pedagogical tools to reach children with special needs.
  6. More teachers with disabilities should be hired.
  7. Multiple sectors should provide early childhood services to reach children comprehensively.
  8. Approaches to support people living with disabilities should involve the community to alleviate societal barriers to progress.
  9. Countries should enforce minimum standards on school accessibility for children with disabilities.
  10. Additional funds are required to meet the education needs of children with disabilities.
This document lists the relevant provisions of  international instruments that refer to the right to education of persons with disabilities.

 

On 3 July 2018, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the violation of rights of Indigenous Peoples around the world. The Resolution 2017/2206(INI) stresses the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with regards to Indigenous Peoples, including SDG 4.5 on access to education, and reiterates that Indigenous Peoples around the world suffer disproportionately from violations of human rights and insufficient access to education, among other fundamental rights.

This document lists the international instruments and provisions relevant to the right to education of minorities and indigenous peoples.

Cet appel, porté par des organisations de la société civile francophone, dont le Right to Education Initiative, a pour vocation d’alerter et de sensibiliser tous les acteurs de l’éducation aux dangers inhérents au processus de marchandisation de l’éducation, qui crée de l’injustice sociale et met en péril l’avenir de nos sociétés.

Resolution (A/HRC/RES/38/9) of the Human Rights Council entitled ‘The right to education: follow-up to Human Rights Council resolution 8/4’.

The publication highlights the low funding of public education which is leading to its decline and consequent growth in privatisation of education. The study also focuses on the private schools’ failure to follow the norms and regulations set out by the Nepali Constitution, as well as the government’s failure to ensure the implementation of these requirements. It also warns that private schools are leading to greater segregation and gaps within the society, between rich and poor, and boys and girls.

The 51-page report, “‘Without Education They Lose Their Future’: Denial of Education to Child Asylum Seekers on the Greek Islands,” found that fewer than 15 percent of more than 3,000 school-age asylum-seeking children on the islands were enrolled in public school at the end of the 2017-2018 school year, and that in government-run camps on the islands, only about 100 children, all preschoolers, had access to formal education. The asylum-seeking children on the islands are denied the educational opportunities they would have on the mainland. Most of those who were able to go to school had been allowed to leave the government-run camps for housing run by local authorities and volunteers.

Education is the right of every child. It empowers children to thrive. It helps promote greater civic engagement and peaceful communities. It is the most effective investment against child poverty and one of the best economic investments a country can make. This is why every child should be in school. Every child must have access to quality education, so they can fulfill their potential. In the State of Palestine, very few children of primary school age are excluded from education, but nearly five per cent of 10-15-year-old children and one out of three 6-9 year-olds with disabilities are out of school. The aim of this study is to identify who these excluded children are, where they live, and to understand why they are not in school.
 
Based on a global initiative led by UNICEF and UNESCO’s Institute for Statistics, it aims at providing a more in-depth analysis, using a unique conceptual and methodological framework to develop comprehensive profiles of out-of-school children and link them to the barriers and bottlenecks that led to school drop-out. It takes into consideration a variety of factors such as socio-economic factors, the quality of education, and the influence of the environment, the community and the school. This study aims not only at understanding what barriers and bottlenecks prevent access to school, but also at taking action about it. Based on research findings, it proposes practical ways of removing these barriers to get children back to school, and to keep the children who are at risk of dropping out in school. By promoting and implementing sound policies that address exclusion, we can make a substantial and sustainable reduction in the number of out of school children.

This report tells the stories of some of the world’s 7.4 million refugee children of school age under UNHCR’s mandate. In addition, it looks at the educational aspirations of refugee youth eager to continue learning after secondary education, and highlights the need for strong partnerships in order to break down the barriers to education for millions of refugee children.

Education data on refugee enrolments and population numbers is drawn from UNHCR’s population database, reporting tools and education surveys and refers to 2017. The report also references global enrolment data from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics referring to 2016.

 

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