According to UNESCO, 264 million children and youth are still out of school around the world, and this is only accounting for the primary (61 million) and secondary school (203 million) age population. In particular, the poorest and most marginalised, including ethnic and religious minorities, persons with disabilities, girls, and populations experiencing conflict, are often systematically unable to access and complete a full cycle of quality education. The first volume of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI) is dedicated to examining international frameworks and national policy as well as the challenges of fulfilling the right to education in practice.

The inaugural issue of NSI on the Right to Education Movements and Policies: Promises and Realities aims to highlight the global and national level experience and perspective on guaranteeing the right to education, as outlined in international frameworks, national constitutions, legislation, and policy, when creating the required administrative structures to ensure that the right is respected, protected, and fulfilled for all.

The Issue is divided into six parts, each focusing on a specific theme of right to education policy and practice. The first part includes an article written by RTE staff on The Role of Court Decisions in the Realisation of the Right to Education, which draws on RTE's background paper on accountability for the GEM Report 2017-8.

 

In South Africa, SECTION27 has used rights-based strategies, including litigation, to hold the state accountable for not ensuring the procurement and delivery of textbooks to schools across Limpopo, a poor rural area of the country.

This case involves the interpretation of the scope of the constitutional right in South Africa to basic education and in particular whether the provision of school textbooks to all basic education learners for the whole academic year is an essential component of this right.

 

Con el objetivo de facilitar la participación activa de padres, niños y niñas, profesores y profesoras, sindicatos, comunidades y organizaciones locales de la sociedad civil en el seguimiento colectivo y la mejora de la calidad de la educación pública, Promoviendo los Derechos en las Escuelas o PRS  por sus siglas en inglés (Promoting Rights in Schools) ofrece un conjunto de herramientas prácticas que pueden ser utilizadas como base para la movilización, abogacía, incidencia y campañas. El paquete proporciona cuatro recursos claves:
 
1) Una carta estatutaria de 10 derechos que, cuando se hayan cumplido, permitirán a todos los niños y niñas completar una educación de buena calidad;
 
2) Una metodología participativa para aprender a: usar la carta estatutaria; recopilar, analizar y usardatos; y consolidar la información de los “informes ciudadanos” que pueden ser utilizados para el desarrollo de planes de acción o para animar los debates y las revisiones a nivel local, distrital y nacional;
 
3) Una serie de indicadores de educación, basados en los derechos humanos y organizados en un formato de encuesta para que los usuarios puedan recoger información de una manera sistemática;
 
4) Una recopilación de referencias claves internacionales de derechos humanos que proporcionan los fundamentos y la legitimidad de la carta estatutaria y de los informes.
 
PRS Promoviendo los Derechos en las Escuelas se basa en la educación y los marcos de derechos humanos para describir una escuela ideal que ofrezca una educación de calidad. Su metodología es compatible con los vínculos entre el programa de trabajo a nivel de la escuela,  las actividades de promoción y los esfuerzos políticos en foros nacionales e internacionales. El proceso es tan importante como el resultado: es sólo a través de la participación de todos los interesados y las interesadas ​​en el proceso - desde el desarrollo de la carta estatutaria, como la recogida de datos, su posterior análisis y elconsiguiente debate de las conclusiones – como se promueve una mayor conciencia de lo que hay que cambiar y de cómo hacerlo.

English

Aimed at actively engaging parents, children, teachers, unions, communities and local civil society organisations in collectively monitoring and improving the quality of public education PRS offers a set of practical tools that can be used as a basis for mobilisation, advocacy and campaigning. The pack provides four key resources:

1) A charter of 10 rights which, when fulfilled, will enable all children to complete a good quality education;

2) A participatory methodology for: using the charter; collecting, analysing and using data; and consolidating information into ‘citizens reports’ that could be used for the development of Action Plans or to encourage discussions and reviews at local, district and national levels;

3) A series of education- and rights-based indicators organised in a survey format to enable users to capture information in a systematic manner;

4) A compilation of key international human rights references providing the foundations and legitimacy of the charter and reports

PRS builds on education and human rights frameworks to describe an ideal school that offers quality education. Its methodology supports links between programme work at the school level and advocacy and policy efforts in national and international forums. The process is as important as the outcome: it is only through engaging all stakeholders in the process - from developing the charter to collecting and analysing the data and debating the findings - that we will promote greater awareness of what needs to change and how.

Español 

This document lists the international instruments that refer to quality education with their relevant provisions.

 

Este documento enumera los instrumentos internacionales que se refieren a la educación de calidad con sus disposiciones pertinentes.

[ENGLISH] [FRANÇAIS]

Key resource

There has been renewed and amplified interest in learning outcomes as a tool for improving quality of education – an issue of central focus in the Post-2015 discussions. There are numerous learning outcomes assessment tools and methodologies.  However, missing from the debates is a human rights perspective. This briefing document, Learning Outcomes Assessments: A Human Rights Perspective, seeks to highlight the key human rights principles that should inform education policies on learning outcomes to ensure that these tools are used to promote quality education that develops the child’s personalities, talents, and abilities to live a full and satisfying life within society.  It also provides recommendations to policy-makers to ensure that education policies on learning outcomes adhere to human rights standards.

 

In 2018, the international community will meet to adopt a new Global Compact on Refugees; a product of the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants. The Compact promises that ‘all refugee children will be in school and learning within a few months of arrival’ and commits to ‘prioritise budgetary provision to facilitate this, including support for host countries as required’. The opportunity to advance this agenda is now. However, commitments without actionable plans do not deliver results.  

The report ‘Time to act: a costed plan to deliver quality education to every last refugee child’ sets out a realistic, global plan to ensure refugee children get to go to school. Save the children challenges governments and international agencies to deliver on the promises they have made with practical action.

In this present report, the Special Rapporteur considers ways in which the right to education contributes to the prevention of atrocity crimes and mass or grave human rights violations. Stressing that education has a key role to play at all stages of prevention, the Special Rapporteur underlines the particularly forceful preventive potential of the right to education in the very early stages, before warning signs are apparent. That role is to be linked with the aims of education and the right to inclusive and equitable quality education, as established in international instruments.
 
Peace, acceptance of the “other”, respect for cultural diversity, the participation of all in the development of society and an education that is adequate and adapted to the specific needs of people in their own context are objectives of education that have been widely recognized by States and in human rights mechanisms at the international and regional levels. However, education is not afforded the importance or the funding it deserves and needs in order to play those roles.
 
The Special Rapporteur, highlighting circumstances under which schools can become tools for division and lay the groundwork for future violent conflicts, focuses on a number of steps regarding the organization of school systems, pedagogy and the values and skills to be transmitted to learners that are crucial in terms of prevention. She proposes an education framework (known in English as the “ABCDE framework”) that encompasses the interrelated features of education needed in order for the preventive potential of the right to education to be fully deployed. Namely, education should promote acceptance of self and others; a sense of belonging to society; critical thinking; diversity; and the capacity of learners to feel empathy for others. The right to inclusive and equitable quality education must be taken seriously and be prioritized if States and other stakeholders are serious in their commitment to prevent violent conflicts, atrocity crimes and mass or grave human rights violations

Pages