This report explores a range of innovative education budget work initiatives from Bangladesh, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Uganda, where civil society has monitored and challenged their governments over education expenditure in order to hold themaccountable for commitments to EFA and the MDGs. It examines the significance and impact of civil society budget initiatives by drawing on interviews and focus group discussions with a range of education stakeholders, including education coalitions, government officials, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), teaching staff and school pupils; and by reviewing research reports and budget manuals developed by civil society organisations (CSOs).

Le bureau de la CVPD Kinshasa s’est donné pour mission la défense et la promotion des droits économique socio culturel parmi lesquels le droit à l’éducation. Ce rapport présente les résultats du suivi de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l'éducation dans la province éducationnelle de Kin-Ouest. Il porte sur les aspects des Infrastructures, Formation des élèves et Recyclage des enseignants, l’Accessibilité par les enfants à l’école, la Participation à la gestion de l’école par les élèves et la Rémunération des enseignants. Apres cinq mois d’enquête, la CVPD a relevé beaucoup de violation de droits à l’éducation scolaire sur le plan de la gratuité de l’enseignement primaire, sur le plan de l’accessibilité à l’école pour les enfants pauvres et sur le plan de l’obligation de l’Etat qui ne fournit aucun effort pour rendre cette formation primaire élémentaire gratuite. La CVPD a aussi remarqué que les enseignants sont sous payés (parfois 12000 Fc soit presque 13$ américain) et que le monnayage de tous les services à l’école est devenu normal. La prédation est aussi relevée dans les chefs des promoteurs des écoles privées, les gestionnaires des écoles de l’Etat et les inspecteurs sensés contrôler le bon fonctionnement de ces écoles. Les infrastructures comme les bâtiments contenants les salles de classe sont vétustes dans la plus part des cas, que ce soit dans les écoles publiques ou privées. Les bibliothèques n’existent plus, l’espace de recréation existe pour les écoles publiques de l’Etat, écoles catholiques et protestantes et non dans les écoles privées où souvent l’école est dans l’enceinte où se trouvent d’autres locateurs. La CVPD salue l’initiative du gouvernement et l'encourage dans son initiative de construction de mille écoles sur toute l’étendue de la république. A Kinshasa, cela a amélioré tant soit peu l’accessibilité et le confort des élèves dans ces écoles nouvellement construites. La CVPD a aussi constaté et remarqué pendant ses enquêtes une augmentation des élèves filles dans toutes les écoles visitées. La moyenne par école est presque arrivée à 65% des filles contre 35% des garçons.

The Education at a Glance OECD Indicators report provides in depth analysis, across a range of indicators, of the state of education in all 35 OECD countries, as well as in a selection of partner countries. The full report is available to view below, and each individual section can also be downloaded as a PDF, here.

In this report, the Secretary-General outlines the linkages between economic, social and cultural rights and the Sustainable Development Goals framework as two converging agendas, and highlights equality, non-discrimination and accountability principles as well as a human rights-based approach to data as key to ensuring the implementation of the 2030 Agenda in a manner consistent with the obligations of States under international law. The report identifies key challenges and opportunities for the human rights-based implementation of the 2030 Agenda and contributions of international human rights mechanisms, and concludes with recommendations to that end.

Based upon Plan International's dataset of 1.4 million sponsored children, the report compares sponsored children with a disability to those without, from 30 countries worldwide. The report, produced in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, reveals that children with disabilities in developing countries are being held back from an education. The findings will help Plan International - and other researchers and organisations - to improve responses to the needs of children with disabilities, particularly their health and education.

The second edition of the Global Education Monitoring Report (GEM Report) presents the latest evidence on global progress towards the education targets of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

With hundreds of millions of people still not going to school, and many not achieving minimum skills at school, it is clear education systems are off track to achieve global goals. The marginalised currently bear the most consequences but also stand to benefit the most if policy-makers pay sufficient attention to their needs. Faced with these challenges, along with tight budgets and increased emphasis on results-oriented value for money, countries are searching for solutions. Increased accountability often tops the list.

The 2017/8 GEM Report shows the entire array of approaches to accountability in education. It ranges from countries unused to the concept, where violations of the right to education go unchallenged, to countries where accountability has become an end in itself instead of a means to inclusive, equitable and high-quality education and lifelong learning for all.

The report emphasises that education is a shared responsibility. While governments have primary responsibility, all actors – schools, teachers, parents, students, international organizations, private sector providers, civil society and the media – have a role in improving education systems. The report emphasises the importance of transparency and availability of information but urges caution in how data are used. It makes the case for avoiding accountability systems with a disproportionate focus on narrowly defined results and punitive sanctions. In an era of multiple accountability tools, the report provides clear evidence on those that are working and those that are not.

This report was commissioned by Right to Education Initiative (RTE) as a stocktaking exercise on RTE’s work on the right to education indicators. The report aims to capture the evolutionary nature of the work, comprising a number of research initiatives. The purpose of the stocktaking exercise is to summarise steps that have been taken to advance RTE’s work on indicators; to highlight achievements in the development and promotion of indicators; to identify lessons learned throughout the process of working on indicators; and to identify recommendations for taking RTE’s work on indicators into the next phase.

The UNESCO Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP-UNESCO) has just published six case studies from Asia and the Pacific to inspire and inform open school data policies in and beyond the region, and to empower citizens to fight corruption in education.

The case studies look at a range of school report card initiatives (both government-led and citizen-led) to create a new evidence base for more informed policy-making on how to use school-related data to create a more transparent and accountable education system.

They look at who publishes school data, what type of data is published, and the level of accessibility and use by various stakeholders. Each case study also draws from a survey of some 250 school-level actors to understand how users of school data currently interact with various school report card initiatives. The case studies conclude with a number of recommendations for more effective school report card design and implementation.

 

The UNESCO Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP-UNESCO) has just published six case studies from Asia and the Pacific to inspire and inform open school data policies in and beyond the region, and to empower citizens to fight corruption in education.

The case studies look at a range of school report card initiatives (both government-led and citizen-led) to create a new evidence base for more informed policy-making on how to use school-related data to create a more transparent and accountable education system.

They look at who publishes school data, what type of data is published, and the level of accessibility and use by various stakeholders. Each case study also draws from a survey of some 250 school-level actors to understand how users of school data currently interact with various school report card initiatives. The case studies conclude with a number of recommendations for more effective school report card design and implementation.

 

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