The right to education in international human rights law is contained in number of international treaties. The most comprehensive coverage of the right is found within the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) under articles 13 and 14. The primary level of education is an essential and integral phase in the development of a child, without the right to education children are unable to realize other rights. This research assesses the functionality of the Egyptian primary education system and its compliance with the international human rights standards of education, specifically the utilizing the 4-A schematic. The indicators included in the 4-A system are defined and analyzed in accordance to the primary level of education. A brief modern history of the Egyptian education system is provided in order to understand current trends. The issues facing the Ministry of Education â are centralization, aid for education and social and economic gaps â and their analysis provides greater insight into the compliance of the state. The final section of this research measures and analyzes the Egyptian system with the international standards in direct correlation to the human rights indicators that comprise the 4-A schematic. There are pockets of defacto discrimination, mostly social-economic that exists within the Egyptian primary education system and by international standards these facets of discrimination should take the highest priority for reform for the Ministry of Education. Other elements detracting from the provision of the right to education includes the quality of education in Egypt and equality. Stronger educational policies that are sharply focused, with targets for implementation being set; comprehensive legislation; and greater levels of awareness and civic engagement are needed in order to protect the right to education at the primary education level.

Le bureau de la CVPD Kinshasa s’est donné pour mission la défense et la promotion des droits économique socio culturel parmi lesquels le droit à l’éducation. Ce rapport présente les résultats du suivi de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l'éducation dans la province éducationnelle de Kin-Ouest. Il porte sur les aspects des Infrastructures, Formation des élèves et Recyclage des enseignants, l’Accessibilité par les enfants à l’école, la Participation à la gestion de l’école par les élèves et la Rémunération des enseignants. Apres cinq mois d’enquête, la CVPD a relevé beaucoup de violation de droits à l’éducation scolaire sur le plan de la gratuité de l’enseignement primaire, sur le plan de l’accessibilité à l’école pour les enfants pauvres et sur le plan de l’obligation de l’Etat qui ne fournit aucun effort pour rendre cette formation primaire élémentaire gratuite. La CVPD a aussi remarqué que les enseignants sont sous payés (parfois 12000 Fc soit presque 13$ américain) et que le monnayage de tous les services à l’école est devenu normal. La prédation est aussi relevée dans les chefs des promoteurs des écoles privées, les gestionnaires des écoles de l’Etat et les inspecteurs sensés contrôler le bon fonctionnement de ces écoles. Les infrastructures comme les bâtiments contenants les salles de classe sont vétustes dans la plus part des cas, que ce soit dans les écoles publiques ou privées. Les bibliothèques n’existent plus, l’espace de recréation existe pour les écoles publiques de l’Etat, écoles catholiques et protestantes et non dans les écoles privées où souvent l’école est dans l’enceinte où se trouvent d’autres locateurs. La CVPD salue l’initiative du gouvernement et l'encourage dans son initiative de construction de mille écoles sur toute l’étendue de la république. A Kinshasa, cela a amélioré tant soit peu l’accessibilité et le confort des élèves dans ces écoles nouvellement construites. La CVPD a aussi constaté et remarqué pendant ses enquêtes une augmentation des élèves filles dans toutes les écoles visitées. La moyenne par école est presque arrivée à 65% des filles contre 35% des garçons.

These Guidelines were developed to assist countries wishing to assess the compatibility of their national education laws and policies with international standards. The booklet aims to provide guidance on national education legal and policy frameworks.

These Guidelines are intended to assist Member States in the preparation of the Reports on the implementation of the 1960 Convention against Discrimination in Education (“the Convention”) as well as the 1960 Recommendation against Discrimination in Education (“the Recommendation”). The Convention and the Recommendation, adopted by UNESCO’s General Conference in 1960, correspond to UNESCO’s constitutional mandate to “advance the ideal of equality of educational opportunities without regard to race, sex or any distinctions, economic or social”.

The Right to Education Index (RTEI) is a global index built out of the international right to education framework to monitor national progress towards its fulfillment. It reveals key areas in need of improvement, offers country-to-country comparisons, and tracks progress over time. Ultimately, RTEI seeks to:

  • Strengthen the expertise and capacity of civil society and education advocates.
  • Increase public and political support for realizing the right to education.
  • Hold governments and institutions accountable for their commitments to the right to education.
  • Uphold the right to education for every child and adult everywhere.

The RTEI has been piloted in five countries (Chile, Nigeria, the Philippines, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe). The Right to Education Index Pilot Report discusses overall findings of the 2015 pilot, comparative issues across Governance and the 4 As (Availability, Accessibility, Acceptability, and Adaptability), select transversal themes such as teachers, private education, and costs of education, and country-specific findings and recommendations from RTEI country partners.

This guide, issued by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), focuses on how civil society can follow up on recommendations of United Nations (UN) human rights mechanisms and mandates or bodies.

Key resource

Education is a fundamental human right of every woman, man and child. In states’ efforts to meet their commitments to making the right to education a reality for all, most have made impressive progress in recent decades. With new laws and policies that remove fees in basic education, significant progress has been made in advancing free education. This has led to tens of millions of children enrolling for the first time and the number of out of school children and adolescents falling by almost half since 2000. Important steps have also been taken with regard to gender parity and states have made efforts to raise the quality of education through improved teacher policies and a growing emphasis on learning outcomes. 

Despite these efforts, breaches of the right to education persist worldwide, illustrated perhaps most starkly by the fact that 262 million primary and secondary-aged children and youth are still out of school. Girls, persons with disabilities, those from disadvantaged backgrounds or rural areas, indigenous persons, migrants and national minorities are among those who face the worst discrimination, affecting both their right to go to school and their rights within schools.

To respond to the challenges, the Right to Education Initiative (RTE) with UNESCO have developed this handbook to guide action on ensuring full compliance with the right to education. Its objective is not to present the right to education as an abstract, conceptual, or purely legal concept, but rather to be action-oriented. The handbook will also be an important reference for those working towards the achievement of SDG4, by offering guidance on how to leverage legal commitment to the right to education as a strategic way to achieve this goal.