This comprehensive report presents the results of the Ninth Consultation of UNESCO’s Member States on the implementation of UNESCO’s Convention and Recommendation against Discrimination in Education. Launched in 2016, this consultation involved 67 UNESCO Member States. The information contained in the national reports generally provides an extremely valuable resource for research and analysis, experience-and knowledge-sharing, and ultimately advocacy.

An interesting finding of the report is that countries seized on this periodic reporting exercise as a valuable opportunity to outline the challenges they face and to take stock of progress and reflect on how to overcome difficulties. The report highlights that the challenges are often crosscutting and intersectoral, making them more difficult to address.

In particular, the report points out serious challenges with regard to equity and inclusion. Socio-economic factors, poverty, ethnicity, location and gender account for significant patterns of discrimination and exclusion in education. Persistent harmful practices and attitudes stand in the way of many children and adults and deprive them of meaningful educational opportunities.

Difficulties relating to the quality of education were equally widely shared by countries, along with budgetary constraints and sometimes lack of governance, coordination and monitoring capacities.

The report also exemplifies the various measures adopted at the national level to ensure that education is provided to all in a discrimination-free environment. The report notably shares the positive measures reported by countries to guarantee inclusion in education, notably for girls and women, refugees, persons with disabilities and indigenous peoples, which is critical to advance SDG4.

This youth report, based on findings and conclusions from the 2017/8 Global Education Monitoring report, asks how young people are involved in the process of accountability in education. As students, what are we responsible for in our education and how are we held accountable? How can we make sure other actors–like schools, universities and governments–are held accountable for their responsibilities? These are critical questions, because we know that there’s a long way to go before all young people around the world have access to a quality education:
absent teachers, overcrowded classrooms, illegitimate diplomas, unregulated private schools and truancy are all issues that education systems are struggling to overcome.

It’s sometimes tempting to say that these problems aren’t ours to fix, that the responsibility lies with the government or with an older generation. But this simply isn’t true: education is a shared responsibility, and young people have an important role to play. In this Report, you’ll hear the stories of young people around the world who have stood up for the right to education in their communities and who have been integral in triggering change. You’ll also read about how you can become involved in our campaign to make sure governments can be held to account for education. This means making sure that citizens can take their governments to court if they are not meeting their education responsibilities. From creating video clips to holding awareness-raising events, there is a range of ways to make your voice heard. Your involvement is integral in making sure the world is on the right path to meeting our education goals. 

In South Africa, SECTION27 has used rights-based strategies, including litigation, to hold the state accountable for not ensuring the procurement and delivery of textbooks to schools across Limpopo, a poor rural area of the country.

This case involves the interpretation of the scope of the constitutional right in South Africa to basic education and in particular whether the provision of school textbooks to all basic education learners for the whole academic year is an essential component of this right.

 

Con el objetivo de facilitar la participación activa de padres, niños y niñas, profesores y profesoras, sindicatos, comunidades y organizaciones locales de la sociedad civil en el seguimiento colectivo y la mejora de la calidad de la educación pública, Promoviendo los Derechos en las Escuelas o PRS  por sus siglas en inglés (Promoting Rights in Schools) ofrece un conjunto de herramientas prácticas que pueden ser utilizadas como base para la movilización, abogacía, incidencia y campañas. El paquete proporciona cuatro recursos claves:
 
1) Una carta estatutaria de 10 derechos que, cuando se hayan cumplido, permitirán a todos los niños y niñas completar una educación de buena calidad;
 
2) Una metodología participativa para aprender a: usar la carta estatutaria; recopilar, analizar y usardatos; y consolidar la información de los “informes ciudadanos” que pueden ser utilizados para el desarrollo de planes de acción o para animar los debates y las revisiones a nivel local, distrital y nacional;
 
3) Una serie de indicadores de educación, basados en los derechos humanos y organizados en un formato de encuesta para que los usuarios puedan recoger información de una manera sistemática;
 
4) Una recopilación de referencias claves internacionales de derechos humanos que proporcionan los fundamentos y la legitimidad de la carta estatutaria y de los informes.
 
PRS Promoviendo los Derechos en las Escuelas se basa en la educación y los marcos de derechos humanos para describir una escuela ideal que ofrezca una educación de calidad. Su metodología es compatible con los vínculos entre el programa de trabajo a nivel de la escuela,  las actividades de promoción y los esfuerzos políticos en foros nacionales e internacionales. El proceso es tan importante como el resultado: es sólo a través de la participación de todos los interesados y las interesadas ​​en el proceso - desde el desarrollo de la carta estatutaria, como la recogida de datos, su posterior análisis y elconsiguiente debate de las conclusiones – como se promueve una mayor conciencia de lo que hay que cambiar y de cómo hacerlo.

English

Aimed at actively engaging parents, children, teachers, unions, communities and local civil society organisations in collectively monitoring and improving the quality of public education PRS offers a set of practical tools that can be used as a basis for mobilisation, advocacy and campaigning. The pack provides four key resources:

1) A charter of 10 rights which, when fulfilled, will enable all children to complete a good quality education;

2) A participatory methodology for: using the charter; collecting, analysing and using data; and consolidating information into ‘citizens reports’ that could be used for the development of Action Plans or to encourage discussions and reviews at local, district and national levels;

3) A series of education- and rights-based indicators organised in a survey format to enable users to capture information in a systematic manner;

4) A compilation of key international human rights references providing the foundations and legitimacy of the charter and reports

PRS builds on education and human rights frameworks to describe an ideal school that offers quality education. Its methodology supports links between programme work at the school level and advocacy and policy efforts in national and international forums. The process is as important as the outcome: it is only through engaging all stakeholders in the process - from developing the charter to collecting and analysing the data and debating the findings - that we will promote greater awareness of what needs to change and how.

Español 

This document lists the international instruments that refer to quality education with their relevant provisions.

 

Este documento enumera los instrumentos internacionales que se refieren a la educación de calidad con sus disposiciones pertinentes.

[ENGLISH] [FRANÇAIS]

On 12 June 2014, during the June Session of the Human Rights Council, the Portuguese Mission, together with Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (PERI) and the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), convened a side-event on privatisation and its impact on the right to education at Palais des Nations in Geneva. In this podcast, Mireille de Koning, from the Education International explains the impact of privatisation on teachers' working conditions.

Key resource

There has been renewed and amplified interest in learning outcomes as a tool for improving quality of education – an issue of central focus in the Post-2015 discussions. There are numerous learning outcomes assessment tools and methodologies.  However, missing from the debates is a human rights perspective. This briefing document, Learning Outcomes Assessments: A Human Rights Perspective, seeks to highlight the key human rights principles that should inform education policies on learning outcomes to ensure that these tools are used to promote quality education that develops the child’s personalities, talents, and abilities to live a full and satisfying life within society.  It also provides recommendations to policy-makers to ensure that education policies on learning outcomes adhere to human rights standards.

 

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