More than 40 percent of Tanzania’s adolescents are left out of quality lower-secondary education despite the government’s positive decision to make lower-secondary education free.

This report examines obstacles, including some rooted in outmoded government policies, that prevent more than 1.5 million adolescents from attending secondary school and cause many students to drop out because of poor quality education. The problems include a lack of secondary schools in rural areas, an exam that limits access to secondary school, and a discriminatory government policy to expel pregnant or married girls.

For a summary, see here.

For an esay to read version, in English, see here.

While many authorities can tolerate some traditional campaigning methods, it is usually harder to ignore the law. As part of broader campaigns, the law can be a powerful tool for achieving the changes that children need. Legal advocacy is now being used systematically in a few countries – leading to strong outcomes for children – and it has great potential for wider use.

There are many occasions for legal advocacy. International law sets out the principles and standards that states are obliged to meet but frequently do not, and so their domestic law violates children’s rights. Often, a state meets a standard in domestic legislation but its policy fails to implement the law. Sometimes, it is unclear what a law means in practice, or the meaning is clear but no one knows whether it is being implemented. These various gaps between international legal standards, domestic law and state policy (or corporate policy) present potential opportunities for legal advocacy.

There are also many avenues for legal advocacy. It is a broad term, not limited to taking rights violators to court. Many small-scale legal activities can enhance traditional campaigning, such as reporting on the implementation of a law, or raising awareness of what the law says. Sometimes, simply documenting and publicising the gaps between law and practice is enough to persuade decision-makers to act. But only sometimes. Towards the other end of the spectrum is work that demands more time and resources, including taking a government or corporation to court in order to bring broader social change. A successful case might improve the legal standards that apply to children, or lead to a major policy change of long-term benefit to children.

This introductory guide offers a brief overview of avenues for legal advocacy. It also offers guidance on how to explore your options, and how to promote legal advocacy work with other children’s rights advocates.

Le Pacte international relatif aux droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (PIDESC) a été adopté par l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies en 1966.
 
L'article 13 est l'article le plus complet sur le droit à l'éducation. Il reconnaît le droit universel à l'éducation sans aucune discrimination et définit un cadre pour la pleine réalisation de ce droit, y compris : l'enseignement primaire obligatoire et gratuit, l'enseignement secondaire généralement disponible et accessible par l'introduction progressive de la gratuité, l'égalité d'accès à l'enseignement supérieur, et des mesures pour favoriser l'alphabétisation et l'amélioration de la qualité d'enseignement.
 
Cet article établit également la liberté des parents de choisir le type d'éducation qu'ils veulent donner à leurs enfants et la liberté de créer et de diriger des établissements d'enseignement, conformément aux normes minimales fixées par l'État.
 
L'article 14 concerne l'obligation de l'État d'adopter un plan d'action pour assurer la gratuité de l'enseignement primaire obligatoire si ce n'est pas encore le cas.
 
La Charte des droits fondamentaux de l'UE rassemble en un seul document les droits fondamentaux protégés dans l'UE. Elle a été proclamée en 2000 et est entrée en vigueur par le traité de Lisbonne en 2009.
 
Sa disposition sur le droit à l'éducation (article 14) inclut le droit à l'égalité d'accès à l'éducation et à la formation professionnelle ; elle protège le droit à l'enseignement obligatoire et la liberté de créer des établissements d'enseignement. La Charte de l'UE protège également les droits des enfants ; son article 32 interdit le travail des enfants et stipule que l'âge minimum d'admission à l'emploi ne doit pas être inférieur à l'âge de fin de scolarité obligatoire. En outre, la Charte de l'Union européenne protège la liberté académique (article 13) et comprend une clause de non-discrimination complète (article 21).