CRC, CESCR and CEDAW statements on private education September 2014 – July 2016: Synthesis paper

This paper highlights key concluding observations adopted between 2014 and 2016 by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR), and the UN Committee on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) regarding the role of private actors in education in Brazil, Chile, Ghana, Haiti, Kenya, Morocco, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Moving towards inclusive education as a human right: An analysis of international legal obligations to implement inclusive education in law and policy

Children with disabilities experience ongoing segregation in special education classes or are otherwise excluded from education. This is in spite of the fact that states have a legal obligation to offer an accessible and inclusive education to all learners. Exclusion of any child from education is a violation of international law and a breach of human rights. The provision of inclusive education is an obligation under international law, as well as the means by which to fulfil the additional legal obligation to make education accessible to children with disabilities.

Bringing Issues of Education and Privatisation to the UN

It is the morning of Wednesday 3rd September, at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights headquarters in Geneva. The die is cast; in a few minutes we will know. My Moroccan colleague, who represents the Moroccan Coalition on Education for All, and myself, representing the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR) are waiting anxiously. Will they ask the question?

Date: 
12 September 2014

International and Regional Child Rights Mechanisms. A guide to the monitoring mechanisms of the Child Rights Committee, the UN Universal Periodic Review and the Regional Child Rights Mechanisms

A primary objective of this report is to provide an overview of and compare the monitoring mechanisms of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the recent UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) from a child rights perspective and how CSOs can best use these mechanisms. This is reflected in Part 1 of the report.


A secondary objective is to provide an overview of the regional human rights/ child rights mechanisms and how Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) can use them for advancing Children’s Rights. Part 2 presents such an overview.

Convention on the Rights of the Child

The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) applies for children under 18. It recognises education as a legal right to every child on the basis of equal opportunity. Its Article 28 guarantees free compulsory primary education for all; progressive free secondary education that should in any case be available and accessible to all; and accessibility to higher education on the basis of capacity. It states the obligation of the State to take measures regarding school attendance and discipline.

CRC General Comment 6: Treatment of unaccompanied and separated children outside their country of origin

This General Comment 6 of the Committee on the Rights of the Child interprets the Convention on the Rights of the Child as regards the treatment of unaccompanied and separated children outside their country of origin. Paragraphs 41 to 43 and 63 and 90 refers to the right to education.

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Economic and Social Rights, Budgets and the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Recent years have seen an explosion in methodologies for monitoring children’s economic and social rights (ESR). Key examples include the development of indicators, benchmarks, child rights-based budget analysis and child rights impact assessments. The Committee on the Right of the Child has praised such tools in its work and has actively promoted their usage. Troublingly, however, there are serious shortcomings in the Committee’s approach to the ESR standards enshrined in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which threaten to impact upon the efficacy of such methodologies.

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