This is a 28-page booklet setting out a process for using a human rights framework to assess a government’s education budget.  The booklet looks at elements of the right to education and where these might be found in a government’s budget; a government’s human rights obligations and questions these raise about a government’s budget; a process for using a rights framework to analyse a government’s education budget; and a short discussion of costing related to the right to education.

 

This guide provides civil society organisations (CSOs) in the education sector with the basic information they need to get started on budget work. It introduces core concepts relating to budgets, and discusses ways of analysing them. It also demonstrates how budget work can inform strategic advocacy messages, and bring about change in the education sector.

This booklet articulates what it means to take an explicitly rights-based approach to government budgets and draws on the lessons of Gender Budget Initiative experiences around the world. It links govern­ments’ commitments under CEDAW with the four main dimen­sions of budgets: revenue, expenditure, macroeconomics of the budget, and budget decision-making processes. It shows links between the share of educational expenditure and the realisation of girls’ right to education.

 

A primary objective of this report is to provide an overview of and compare the monitoring mechanisms of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the recent UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) from a child rights perspective and how CSOs can best use these mechanisms. This is reflected in Part 1 of the report.


A secondary objective is to provide an overview of the regional human rights/ child rights mechanisms and how Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) can use them for advancing Children’s Rights. Part 2 presents such an overview.


The report offers conclusions on the Child Rights impact of the CRC mechanisms, the UPR and the regional mechanisms.

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) provides a new and exciting opportunity for advocates to hold the United States government accountable to all its human rights obligations and commitments. This toolkit is meant to help human rights advocates engage with the UPR process, especially advocates interested in human rights in the United States and the U.S. government's participation in the UPR. The manual contains two main sections. The first section presents the steps involved before and after the UPR. The second section points out entry points for non-governmental organisations (NGOs): engage in consultation with government; submit a stakeholder report; lobby other countries; attend the UPR Working Group session; participate in the Human Rights Council session; follow-up work to ensure implementation. The Appendix contains templates and samples of NGO submissions

This guide presents ideas and methodologies to put a human rights-based approach to education in practice. It focuses on six strategic areas that are central to (and provide a framework for) a HRBA to education including: understanding and securing the right to education working with excluded groups; financing education; promoting citizen participation in education securing rights in education; advancing a full "Education for All" agenda. Each section begins with a brief overview of key issues to be considered and then discusses a range of activities which could be developed within a scheme of work. Short practical examples are given, from a wide range of countries. The majority of the activities focus on work at the local level, but national and international links are also discussed. Within each section two or three areas are analysed in more detail.

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These Guidelines were developed to assist countries wishing to assess the compatibility of their national education laws and policies with international standards. The booklet aims to provide guidance on national education legal and policy frameworks.

This guide, issued by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), focuses on how civil society can follow up on recommendations of United Nations (UN) human rights mechanisms and mandates or bodies.

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