This youth report, based on findings and conclusions from the 2017/8 Global Education Monitoring report, asks how young people are involved in the process of accountability in education. As students, what are we responsible for in our education and how are we held accountable? How can we make sure other actors–like schools, universities and governments–are held accountable for their responsibilities? These are critical questions, because we know that there’s a long way to go before all young people around the world have access to a quality education:
absent teachers, overcrowded classrooms, illegitimate diplomas, unregulated private schools and truancy are all issues that education systems are struggling to overcome.

It’s sometimes tempting to say that these problems aren’t ours to fix, that the responsibility lies with the government or with an older generation. But this simply isn’t true: education is a shared responsibility, and young people have an important role to play. In this Report, you’ll hear the stories of young people around the world who have stood up for the right to education in their communities and who have been integral in triggering change. You’ll also read about how you can become involved in our campaign to make sure governments can be held to account for education. This means making sure that citizens can take their governments to court if they are not meeting their education responsibilities. From creating video clips to holding awareness-raising events, there is a range of ways to make your voice heard. Your involvement is integral in making sure the world is on the right path to meeting our education goals. 

The present report, submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolutions 8/4 and 26/17, is devoted to lifelong learning and the right to education. The Special Rapporteur sheds light on the vision and concept of lifelong learning and highlights the emergence of the 'right to learning', intertwined with the right to education and training as a social right. He also examines state responsibility, along with that of other social partners, for its realisation and underlines the key importance placed on lifelong learning in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Special Rapporteur also looks at the special role that devolves upon technical and vocational education and training for skills development and analyses the issues in financing lifelong learning. Finally, the Special Rapporteur offers a set of recommendations with a view to promoting learning as a right and its pursuit from a lifelong learning perspective, in keeping with state obligations as set out in international human rights instruments.

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Dans ce rapport, le Rapporteur spécial apporte un éclairage sur la vision et le concept de l’apprentissage tout au long de la vie et souligne l’émergence d’un « droit à l’apprentissage », étroitement lié au droit à l’éducation et à la formation comme droit social. Il examine en outre la responsabilité des États, ainsi que des autres partenaires sociaux, pour sa réalisation et souligne l’importance clef accordée à l’apprentissage tout au long de la vie dans le Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030. Le Rapporteur spécial se penche également sur le rôle particulier qui est donné à l’enseignement et à la formation techniques et professionnels pour le développement des compétences et analyse les questions liées au financement de l’apprentissage tout au long de la vie.

Enfin, il formule un ensemble de recommandations visant à promouvoir l’apprentissage comme droit et dans une perspective d’apprentissage tout au long de la vie, pour satisfaire aux obligations des États énoncées dans les instruments internationaux relatifs aux droits de l’homme.

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En este informe, el Relator Especial arroja luz sobre la visión y el concepto del aprendizaje permanente, y destaca el nacimiento del “derecho al aprendizaje” como derecho social estrechamente relacionado con el derecho a la educación y la formación. Asimismo, examina la responsabilidad del Estado y de otros interlocutores sociales con respecto al goce efectivo de este derecho, y subraya la importancia primordial que se otorga al aprendizaje permanente en la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible. El Relator Especial examina también el papel especial que desempeña la educación y formación técnica y profesional en el desarrollo de aptitudes, y analiza las cuestiones relacionadas con la financiación del aprendizaje permanente.

Por último, el Relator Especial ofrece una serie de recomendaciones con miras a promover el aprendizaje como derecho y su búsqueda desde la perspectiva del aprendizaje permanente, en consonancia con las obligaciones del Estado en virtud de los instrumentos internacionales de derechos humanos.

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In this report, the Special Rapporteur sheds light on the vision and concept of lifelong learning and highlights the emergence of the “right to learning”, intertwined with the right to education and training as a social right. He also examines State responsibility, along with that of other social partners, for its realization and underlines the key importance placed on lifelong learning in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Special Rapporteur also looks at the special role that devolves upon technical and vocational education and training for skills development and analyses the issues in financing lifelong learning.

Finally, the Special Rapporteur offers a set of recommendations with a view to promoting learning as a right and its pursuit from a lifelong learning perspective, in keeping with State obligations as set out in international human rights instruments.

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Le Cadre d'action accompagne la Déclaration mondiale sur l'éducation pour tous; elle est destinée à servir de référence et de guide aux gouvernements nationaux, aux organisations internationales, aux éducateurs et aux professionnels du développement pour la formulation de leurs propres plans d'action pour la mise en œuvre de la Déclaration mondiale.

 

Free to Think 2020 analyzes 341 attacks on higher education communities in 58 countries between September 1, 2019 and August 31, 2020. The report draws on data from SAR’s Academic Freedom Monitoring Project and identifies trends related to attacks on higher education communities, including violent attacks on campuses in Afghanistan, India, and Yemen; wrongful imprisonments and prosecutions of scholars; restrictions on academic travel, deployed most prominently by authorities in Israel, Turkey, and the United States; pressures on student expression included sustained pressures in Colombia, India, the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and South Africa; and legislative and administrative threats to university autonomy, including in Brazil, Ghana, Poland, Romania, Russia, and Turkey.

Free to Think 2020 analyzes 341 attacks on higher education communities in 58 countries between September 1, 2019 and August 31, 2020. The report draws on data from Scholars At Risk’s Academic Freedom Monitoring Project and identifies trends related to attacks on higher education communities, including violent attacks on campuses in Afghanistan, India, and Yemen; wrongful imprisonments and prosecutions of scholars; restrictions on academic travel, deployed most prominently by authorities in Israel, Turkey, and the United States; pressures on student expression included sustained pressures in Colombia, India, the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and South Africa; and legislative and administrative threats to university autonomy, including in Brazil, Ghana, Poland, Romania, Russia, and Turkey.

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