This manual provides guidance to national authorities seeking to prepare and enact domestic legislation and policies addressing internal displacement in their country.

Chapter 15 is about the protection of education during and after displacement.

The purpose of the INEE Reference Guide on External Education Financing is to enable national decision-makers in low-income countries, including those in fragile situations, to better understand the ways in which donors provide education assistance, how various funding mechanisms work and why donors choose one funding mechanism over another to support education. In addition, it is hoped that this publication will help increase education policy-makers’ awareness of the types of external assistance used to fill gaps in domestic education funding at the field level.

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

In addition to this overview, the module includes a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs (Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3)

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

In addition to this PowerPoint Presentation, the module includes an overview  and three hand-outs (Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3)

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

The module includes an overview, a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs ( Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3).

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

The module includes an overview, a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs ( Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3).

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

The module includes an overview, a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs ( Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3).

The aim of this report is to provide practitioners and policy-makers in both transitional justice and education with conceptual clarity and practical guidance for developing synergies between their respective fields in responding to past human rights violations. Drawing from a comparative approach that examines different experiences throughout the world, this report does not offer a blueprint for addressing past injustices through education, but, rather, considerations that should be taken into account when framing policy that is based on the particularities of a given context.

The report looks at how a transitional justice framework can play an important role in identifying educational deficits related to the logic of past conflict and repression and informing the reconstruction of the education sector. It also looks at how formal and informal education can facilitate and sustain the work of transitional justice measures.

Section I, which sets out the report’s framework, offers a discussion of what it means to consider transitional justice and education as separate but related elements of societal responses to injustices associated with massive human rights violations, and the contribution that synergies between the two fields can make to establish sustainable peace and prevent the recurrence of abuses. This section, thus, poses the question of what a transitional justice approach brings to the role of education in peacebuilding.

Section II maps out the different components of education reconstruction in which a transitional justice framework can be expected to make a difference. This includes incorporating lessons from transitional justice processes into educational curricula; increasing access to education through reparations or redress measures; and shaping school culture and governance, pedagogy, teaching tools, and teacher capacity and training.

The next three sections consider a range of political and material challenges that actors are likely to face in trying to link transitional justice and education and discuss some strategic considerations for implementing proposed ideas more effectively and sustainably.

Section III highlights the different actors that can play a role in linking transitional justice and education, including transitional justice bodies, civil society groups, school communities, and government, each of which can be an agent of change or an obstacle.

Section IV examines the more capacity and resource-based constraints that efforts to address the past through education are likely to face.

Section V emphasises the importance of identifying opportunities for change while maintaining realistic expectations for the change that can be achieved.

Section VI distills the findings to a set of guidance points for relevant actors. However, in offering guidance about the kind of change being proposed and potential steps, it is important to remember that policies aimed at addressing past injustice through education are very likely to be contested. The specific context will influence the level of this contestation as well as the usefulness of any recommendations, and so contextual analysis will be a critical first step. The guidance offered here must be considered with regard to each unique context. It cannot be assumed, for example, that all communities will desire full integration of schools or support incorporating a justice agenda into classroom learning. Some types of opposition to such eff orts, we argue, should be challenged, but some may be legitimate and / or unlikely to be overcome. These kinds of tensions between the principles of justice being advocated and the reality in which measures based on those principles may be proposed, designed, and implemented must be kept in mind. That said, the research conducted for this project suggests that a context specific approach to addressing the past through education can make a valuable contribution to peacebuilding.

Key resource

This comprehensive handbook focuses on education-related violations in suitations of insecurity and armed conflict. It explores the international legal protection afforded to both the right to education as a human right, and education more generally under international human rights law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. 

Key resource

This document expresses a commitment that all individuals - children, youth and adults - have a right to education. The standards articulate the minimum level of educational quality and access in emergencies through to recovery. They can be used as a capacity-building and training tool for humanitarian agencies, governments and affected populations to enhance the effectiveness and quality of their educational assistance. They help to enhance accountability and predictability among humanitarian actors and improve coordination among partners, including education authorities. The INEE Minimum Standards are founded on the Convention of the Rights of the Child, the Dakar 2000 Education for All goals, and the Sphere Project's Humanitarian Charter.

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