Training Module on Privatisation and the Right to Education: Notes

This two-days training module seeks to uncover how the right to education may be impacted by privatisation and explores methods for challenging privatisation that negatively impacts education rights. This document serves as the facilitator’s main module notes and should be used with the presentation slides. It contains a session-by-session breakdown of activities, including presentations, discussion questions, and group exercises. At the end of this session participants will have gained an awareness of:

10 Human Rights Standards for Education Privatisation

This factsheet on 10 Human Rights Standards for Education Privatisation is intended to serve as a tool for education and human rights advocates on the topic of the privatisation of education and the right to education.  It provides basic information on the right to education as it relates to education privatisation, focusing on the most central international human rights legal standards that relate to privatisation.

Privatisation vs the Public Good

This article explores the increasing privatisation of education. It examines various criticisms of the private provision of education and claims that privatisation is driven by an ideological agenda which is generally uncaring about any notion of the “public good” purposes of education — that is, of its role in producing social cohesion through the provision of education that is of high quality for all members of society.

Do Public Private Partnerships Promote or Hinder the Right to Education?

This policy brief looks at the role of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in education from a human rights perspective, whereby the private and public sectors have distinct (although admittedly compatible) responsibilities. Using the 4-A approach to the right to education (availability, accessibility, acceptability and adaptability) it analyses the consequences of using PPP for education delivery (focusing on quality, accountability and discrimination issues) and advocates for a clearer rights-based approach to the issue.

Privatisation of Education and the Right to Education

This article discusses the privatisation of education from a human rights perspective. It focuses on what international human rights law in general, and the right to education in particular has to say with respect to the operation and consequences of privatisation in the area of education. The article reviews the content of the right to education and makes observations on the relationship between privatisation and violations of obligations resulting from the right to education. It provides a definition of the privatisation of education and an analysis of potential human rights issues.

Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Implementing the United Nations ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ Framework

Written by John Ruggie, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Business and Human Rights, these Guiding Principles are designed to provide for the first time a global standard for preventing and addressing the risk of adverse impacts on human rights linked to business activity. The Human Rights Council endorsed the Guiding Principles in its resolution 17/4 of 16 June 2011.

[ESPAÑOL]

Human Rights and Privatisation

This document considers the State's obligations, and how they translate in the context of economic, social and cultural Rights, including the right to education (derived from the four key principles of equality and non-discrimination; indivisibility and interdependence of rights; accountability; and participation); Responsibilities of Non-State Actors, including Companies; and, Amnesty International's Human Rights Principles Concerning Delivery of Essential Services.

 

Using Human Rights Standards to Assess Privatisation of Education in Africa

According to international law, States have the principal responsibility ‘to ensure the direct provision of the right to education in most circumstances.  Although private education is allowed under international law, there are specific conditions and limitations under which private education must operate.  While empirical data about the effectiveness of public and private schools is needed to inform the debate on how to achieve quality education, there also needs to be criteria to assess the measures for determining ‘effectiveness’ and to define what models of private education are ac

Páginas