Education Under Attack: a guidance note for journalists and photographers

Changes in the media market after the end of the cold war, the development of new technologies and the hindering consequences of multiple economic crises have strengthened collaboration between journalists, photographers, videographers, and NGOs. Media reporting on conflict zones could play an enhanced role in helping civil society organisation’s (CSOs) efforts to document attacks on education and CSO knowledge and connections could help journalists uncover important stories from the front lines. 

Monitoring Education Under Attack from a Human Rights Perspective

This monitoring guide is designed to help civil society organisations monitor education under attack from a human rights perspective. It will guide you through:

I: the importance of monitoring

II: give you advice on what to look for and how to collect data

III: provide you with a list of indicators you might want to look at

IV: give recommendations on how and who to report to when identifying violations of the right to education. 

The right to education movements and policies: Promises and realities

NORRAG Special Issue No 1. The right to education movement and policies: Promises and realities

According to UNESCO, 264 million children and youth are still out of school around the world, and this is only accounting for the primary (61 million) and secondary school (203 million) age population. In particular, the poorest and most marginalised, including ethnic and religious minorities, persons with disabilities, girls, and populations experiencing conflict, are often systematically unable to access and complete a full cycle of quality education.

General comment No. 24 on state obligations under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in the context of business activities

Businesses play an important role in the realisation of economic, social and cultural rights, inter alia, by contributing to the creation of employment opportunities and, through private investment, to development. However, the Committee has been regularly presented with situations in which, as a result of states' failure to ensure compliance with internationally recognised human rights under their jurisdiction, corporate activities negatively affected economic, social and cultural rights.