South African court holds that private schools must consider the best interests of the child when collecting tuition fees

The importance and value of an education and its status as a fundamental human right is universally recognised. Sadly, for many learners in South Africa’s public education system, the enjoyment of this right is constantly being threatened by an array of historical and administrative challenges. Under apartheid, historically ‘black’ schools were cruelly underfunded and under-resourced and this legacy has led to many public schools facing systemic problems that still persist to this day.

Date: 
11 شباط (فبراير) 2019

Right to education handbook

Education is a fundamental human right of every woman, man and child. In states’ efforts to meet their commitments to making the right to education a reality for all, most have made impressive progress in recent decades. With new laws and policies that remove fees in basic education, significant progress has been made in advancing free education. This has led to tens of millions of children enrolling for the first time and the number of out of school children and adolescents falling by almost half since 2000.

History RePPPeated - How public private partnerships are failing

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly being promoted as the solution to the shortfall in financing needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Economic infrastructure, such as railways, roads, airports and ports, but also key services such as health, education, water and electricity are being delivered through PPPs in both the global north and south.

CRC, CESCR and CEDAW statements on private education September 2014 – November 2017

This paper highlights key concluding observations adopted between September 2014 and November 2017 by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR), the UN Committee on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights (ACHPR) regarding the role of private actors in education in Ghana, Chile, Morocco, Uganda, Kenya, Philippines and Brazil.

Nepal: patterns of privatisation in education. A case study of low-fee private schools and private chain schools

The publication highlights the low funding of public education which is leading to its decline and consequent growth in privatisation of education. The study also focuses on the private schools’ failure to follow the norms and regulations set out by the Nepali Constitution, as well as the government’s failure to ensure the implementation of these requirements. It also warns that private schools are leading to greater segregation and gaps within the society, between rich and poor, and boys and girls.

Report of side event: 'Privatization, civil society, schools, and human rights'

During the 38th session of the Human Rights Council, OIDEL and the Permanent Mission of Portugal, cohosted a side event on the privatization of education, with the participation of four experts: Delphine Dorsi (Executive Coordinator of Right to Education Initiative); Ignasi Grau (representative of OIDEL); Louis-Marie Piron (delegate in charge of international relations of the Secretary General of Catholic Education in France); and

Report of the Francophone meeting on the commodification and privatization of education, Dakar, 23-26 October 2017

From October 23 to 26, the second Francophone Meeting on the Merchandising and Privatization of Education was held at the Francophonie Institute for Education and Training in Dakar. This event brought together 107 delegates from 25 countries. The report provides an overview of privatization and commodification in the French-speaking world, based on the discussions that took place during the meeting, as well as a summary of the Francophone consultation on the human rights guiding principles on States’ obligations regarding private actors in education.

Analysis of support to private sector engagement in global partnership for education recipient countries

This report provides an analysis of support to private sector engagement in Global Partnership for Education (GPE) recipient countries, building off a prior study focusing on GPE decision-making on private schooling. This review includes an analysis of 101 documents relating to the 40 GPE recipient partner countries with active Education Sector Program Implementation Grants (ESPIGs). Country profiles of Haiti, Pakistan, and Uganda are provided in an Appendix, each of which highlights important trends with implications for GPE support to private participation in education.

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