Aimed at actively engaging parents, children, teachers, unions, communities and local civil society organisations in collectively monitoring and improving the quality of public education PRS offers a set of practical tools that can be used as a basis for mobilisation, advocacy and campaigning. The pack provides four key resources:

1) A charter of 10 rights which, when fulfilled, will enable all children to complete a good quality education;

2) A participatory methodology for: using the charter; collecting, analysing and using data; and consolidating information into ‘citizens reports’ that could be used for the development of Action Plans or to encourage discussions and reviews at local, district and national levels;

3) A series of education- and rights-based indicators organised in a survey format to enable users to capture information in a systematic manner;

4) A compilation of key international human rights references providing the foundations and legitimacy of the charter and reports

PRS builds on education and human rights frameworks to describe an ideal school that offers quality education. Its methodology supports links between programme work at the school level and advocacy and policy efforts in national and international forums. The process is as important as the outcome: it is only through engaging all stakeholders in the process - from developing the charter to collecting and analysing the data and debating the findings - that we will promote greater awareness of what needs to change and how.

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When working on human rights issues, you should consider a person’s right to decide whether they want to be featured in written, recorded or audiovisual work. 

It is an ethical consideration which protects individuals from exploitation. It is also a legal requirement:  in many countries you cannot share, store or publish content if consent has not been obtained. 

 

International and regional human rights bodies monitor and review progress made on the implementation of human rights treaties on a regular basis and continuously issue recommendations to States to improve the situation of children’s rights in each country. Civil society plays a crucial role in monitoring progress and challenges for children’s rights on the ground. Civil society practitioners often know about these processes and contribute to these recommendations. But not always are these recommendations systematically follow-up on to see what happens once the States receive them, and whether these recommendations are actually used to improve the situation. At the same time, many of us within civil society do not know about these processes and recommendations and miss opportunities that could strengthen our ongoing work.

This guide aims to empower and inspire civil society practitioners to follow-up, use and make the most of these recommendations as part of their daily work to advance realisation of children’s rights in their countries. To that end, it provides a step-by-step plan of activities to consider, with case studies and practical tips and formats to help us in that journey. It also provides some additional links with background information for those of us with less experience in this field.

 

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