La Convention relative aux droits de l'enfant (CIDE) s'applique aux enfants de moins de 18 ans. Elle reconnaît l'éducation comme un droit à chaque enfant sur la base de l'égalité des chances. Son article 28 garantit la gratuité de l'enseignement primaire obligatoire pour tous, la gratuité progressive de l'enseignement secondaire qui devrait en tout état de cause être disponible et accessible à tous, et l'accessibilité à l'enseignement supérieur en fonction des capacités. Il énonce l'obligation de l'État de prendre des mesures concernant la fréquentation scolaire. Elle encourage la coopération internationale en matière d'éducation, en particulier l'élimination de l'analphabétisme et la favorisation de l'accès aux connaissances scientifiques et techniques. Son article 29 définit les objectifs de l'éducation et reconnaît également la liberté des parents de choisir le type d'éducation qu'ils veulent donner à leurs enfants et la liberté de créer et de diriger des établissements d'enseignement, conformément aux normes minimales fixées par l'État.
 

The fifth edition of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI 05)) entitled 'Domestic Financing: Tax and Education' aims to analyse tax justice and domestic resource mobilization, with a special focus on the global South.

NSI 05 consists of 25 articles which aim to highlight global and national-level experiences and perspectives. It calls for greater attention to issues that influence national resource capacities for education and how that funding may be used. Questions of financing education are even more pressing as we face the consequences of Covid-19 and the impact of lockdowns globally. This pandemic is radically changing school attendance and learning, as well as the amount of education spending available from a diminished tax base.

The issue is composed of six sections that showcase global perspectives as well as local case studies, discussing the links between tax justice and domestic financing for education from different standpoints. 

  • Part one features global perspectives on tax and education, why tax matters — particularly in times of a global health crisis — and the role of international instruments and actors.
  • Part two sheds light on progressive and regressive national tax reforms with specific case studies from Ghana, India and Pakistan.
  • Part three salutes local movements and activism to reform tax for equitable education provision.
  • Part four calls for global reforms and greater attention to the impacts of corporations and philanthropic actors on tax justice.
  • Part five addresses concerns regarding the increasing trend of privatization of education, illustrated by three case studies from the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Uganda
  • Part six outlines the social movements and struggles surrounding education and tax.

Chapter 3 focuses on the obligations under international human rights law to resources public education through taxes.

NSI 05’s guest editor, David Archer, is Head of Civic Participation, Tax Justice and Public Services at ActionAid (UK), and holds extensive experience in education. He co-founded the Global Campaign for Education, is the Board Chair of the Right to Education Initiative, Chair of the Strategy and Impact Committee of the Global Partnership for Education and is a trustee of the UK Education and Development Forum (UKFIET).

The fifth edition of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI 05)) entitled 'Domestic Financing: Tax and Education' aims to analyse tax justice and domestic resource mobilization, with a special focus on the global South.

NSI 05 consists of 25 articles which aim to highlight global and national-level experiences and perspectives. It calls for greater attention to issues that influence national resource capacities for education and how that funding may be used. Questions of financing education are even more pressing as we face the consequences of Covid-19 and the impact of lockdowns globally. This pandemic is radically changing school attendance and learning, as well as the amount of education spending available from a diminished tax base.

The issue is composed of six sections that showcase global perspectives as well as local case studies, discussing the links between tax justice and domestic financing for education from different standpoints. 

  • Part one features global perspectives on tax and education, why tax matters — particularly in times of a global health crisis — and the role of international instruments and actors.
  • Part two sheds light on progressive and regressive national tax reforms with specific case studies from Ghana, India and Pakistan.
  • Part three salutes local movements and activism to reform tax for equitable education provision.
  • Part four calls for global reforms and greater attention to the impacts of corporations and philanthropic actors on tax justice.
  • Part five addresses concerns regarding the increasing trend of privatization of education, illustrated by three case studies from the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Uganda
  • Part six outlines the social movements and struggles surrounding education and tax.

Chapter 3 focuses on the obligations under international human rights law to resources public education through taxes.

NSI 05’s guest editor, David Archer, is Head of Civic Participation, Tax Justice and Public Services at ActionAid (UK), and holds extensive experience in education. He co-founded the Global Campaign for Education, is the Board Chair of the Right to Education Initiative, Chair of the Strategy and Impact Committee of the Global Partnership for Education and is a trustee of the UK Education and Development Forum (UKFIET).

This paper shows that pre-primary education has not yet achieved the level of priority necessary in domestic policies and budgets, with nearly all low-income countries dedicating less than 5 per cent of their education budgets to pre-primary education. The most disadvantaged, marginalised and vulnerable, who stand to gain the most from investments in pre-primary education, are frequently left behind. Moreover, the international community has not kept pace to incentivise governments to invest in pre-primary education — less than 1 per cent of ODA is dedicated to pre-primary education. Major bilateral and multilateral actors are not using the little resources available to best effect to impact the most disadvantaged. This paper includes a set of recommendations on funding to ensure quality pre-primary education for all. 

 
 

Le Cadre d'action accompagne la Déclaration mondiale sur l'éducation pour tous; elle est destinée à servir de référence et de guide aux gouvernements nationaux, aux organisations internationales, aux éducateurs et aux professionnels du développement pour la formulation de leurs propres plans d'action pour la mise en œuvre de la Déclaration mondiale.

 

Key resource

Education is a fundamental human right of every woman, man and child. In states’ efforts to meet their commitments to making the right to education a reality for all, most have made impressive progress in recent decades. With new laws and policies that remove fees in basic education, significant progress has been made in advancing free education. This has led to tens of millions of children enrolling for the first time and the number of out of school children and adolescents falling by almost half since 2000. Important steps have also been taken with regard to gender parity and states have made efforts to raise the quality of education through improved teacher policies and a growing emphasis on learning outcomes. 

Despite these efforts, breaches of the right to education persist worldwide, illustrated perhaps most starkly by the fact that 262 million primary and secondary-aged children and youth are still out of school. Girls, persons with disabilities, those from disadvantaged backgrounds or rural areas, indigenous persons, migrants and national minorities are among those who face the worst discrimination, affecting both their right to go to school and their rights within schools.

To respond to the challenges, the Right to Education Initiative (RTE) with UNESCO have developed this handbook to guide action on ensuring full compliance with the right to education. Its objective is not to present the right to education as an abstract, conceptual, or purely legal concept, but rather to be action-oriented. The handbook will also be an important reference for those working towards the achievement of SDG4, by offering guidance on how to leverage legal commitment to the right to education as a strategic way to achieve this goal. 

FRANCAIS

The Latin American Campaign for the Right to Education (CLADE, by its Spanish acronym) is a pluralistic network of civil society organizations with a presence in 18 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, which promotes social mobilization and political advocacy to defend the human right to education. This collection of articles, essays and statements reflect on the vital role of public education in the region and the fault lines exposed by the pandemic, considering both the challenges public education in Latin America faces and possible solutions, alternatives and ways forward.

 

 

At the Global Education Summit, 37 CSOs Call on World Education Leaders to Use Multi-billion Dollars Funding to Support Public Education
 
As Ministers of education and other leading stakeholders in education meet on 28-29 July 2021 at the Global Education Summit, 37 CSOs call on governments to make robust funding commitments for the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) and urge GPE and its partners to use the money raised during the summit in support of free public education and to ensure that no funding is used to support commercial actors, in accordance with human rights requirements.
 
GPE is the main multilateral funding body solely dedicated to transforming education in lower-income countries. It plays a critical role in the strengthening of education systems of dozens of countries. World education leaders are meeting at the Global Education Summit with a target to raise at least 5 billion US Dollars for 2021–2025, in order to fund developing countries’ education plans.
 

Au Sommet mondial sur l'éducation, 37 OSC appellent les leaders mondiaux de l'éducation à utiliser des fonds de plusieurs milliards de dollars pour soutenir l’enseignement public 

Déclaration conjointe, le 27 juillet 2021

Alors que les ministres de l'éducation nationale et d'autres acteurs majeurs de l'éducation se réunissent les 28 et 29 juillet 2021 à l'occasion du Sommet mondial sur l'éducation, 37 OSC appellent les gouvernements à prendre des engagements solides en matière de financement pour le Partenariat mondial pour l'éducation (GPE) et exhortent le GPE à utiliser les fonds réunis pendant le Sommet pour soutenir l’enseignement public gratuit et veiller à ce qu’aucun financement ne soit utilisé pour soutenir des acteurs commerciaux, conformément aux exigences des droits de l'Homme. 

Le GPE est le principal organisme de financement multilatéral qui se consacre exclusivement à la transformation de l'éducation dans les pays à faibles revenus. Il joue un rôle essentiel dans le renforcement des systèmes éducatifs de dizaines de pays. Les leaders mondiaux de l'éducation se réunissent au Sommet mondial sur l'éducation avec pour objectif de réunir au moins 5 milliards de dollars US pour 2021-2025, afin de financer les plans d'éducation des pays en développement.   

 

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