This report shows that the Philippines is neglecting its obligation to guarantee free public education for all. Since 2009 the government’s allocation of funds to private school chains has increased to more than PHP 31 Billion, nearly $700 million USD, which Riep points out could have paid for 60 thousand more classrooms and accommodated roughly 3 million students.

The report reveals how for-profit schools are using the education system, with the aid of public money, to produce a generation of young people programmed to work as “semi-skilled... cheap labour” for a plethora of corporations in the Philippines. At the same time, low-fee, for-profit schools are employing untrained teachers for low wages at the cost of quality education.

The main findings of the report are:

  • Complicity and failure on the part of Filipino government to fulfil its obligations to provide quality free education for its citizens - this on the heels of the adoption of the SDGs and the FFA.
  • It also reveals failure on the development, implementation and enforcement of legislative requirements that go to for-profit schooling - noting that APEC receives directly and indirectly government/tax payer funding.
  • The report further highlights failure on enforcing a social contract / minimum standards regarding qualified teachers, curriculum and facilities. In fact, the government waived legislative requirements vis a vis school facilities.  
  • What is new here is the state sponsored / subsidised human resource factories directly advancing Ayala’s business interests. This is achieved by reverse engineering the curriculum to produce an army of labour for their businesses e.g. call centres. All in all, the research provides evidence why the profit motive has no place in dictating what is taught, how it’s taught nor how schools are organised. 

The second edition of the Global Education Monitoring Report (GEM Report) presents the latest evidence on global progress towards the education targets of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

With hundreds of millions of people still not going to school, and many not achieving minimum skills at school, it is clear education systems are off track to achieve global goals. The marginalised currently bear the most consequences but also stand to benefit the most if policy-makers pay sufficient attention to their needs. Faced with these challenges, along with tight budgets and increased emphasis on results-oriented value for money, countries are searching for solutions. Increased accountability often tops the list.

The 2017/8 GEM Report shows the entire array of approaches to accountability in education. It ranges from countries unused to the concept, where violations of the right to education go unchallenged, to countries where accountability has become an end in itself instead of a means to inclusive, equitable and high-quality education and lifelong learning for all.

The report emphasises that education is a shared responsibility. While governments have primary responsibility, all actors – schools, teachers, parents, students, international organizations, private sector providers, civil society and the media – have a role in improving education systems. The report emphasises the importance of transparency and availability of information but urges caution in how data are used. It makes the case for avoiding accountability systems with a disproportionate focus on narrowly defined results and punitive sanctions. In an era of multiple accountability tools, the report provides clear evidence on those that are working and those that are not.

The report focuses on the legal obligations of states and private entities to mobilise all resources at their disposal, including those that could be collected through taxation or prevention of illicit financial flows, to satisfy minimum essential levels of human rights and finds that states who facilitate or actively promote tax abuses, at the domestic or cross-border level, may be in violation of international human rights law.

The report is based on a detailed examination of UN treaty bodies and special procedures’ views on the current interpretation of the scope and content of this obligation to mobilise resources. Further, it is published against the backdrop of increased awareness of the relationship between economic policies and human rights and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which committed all UN member states to ‘strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection’ and ‘significantly reduce illicit financial flows’.

According to UNESCO, 264 million children and youth are still out of school around the world, and this is only accounting for the primary (61 million) and secondary school (203 million) age population. In particular, the poorest and most marginalised, including ethnic and religious minorities, persons with disabilities, girls, and populations experiencing conflict, are often systematically unable to access and complete a full cycle of quality education. The first volume of NORRAG Special Issue (NSI) is dedicated to examining international frameworks and national policy as well as the challenges of fulfilling the right to education in practice.

The inaugural issue of NSI on the Right to Education Movements and Policies: Promises and Realities aims to highlight the global and national level experience and perspective on guaranteeing the right to education, as outlined in international frameworks, national constitutions, legislation, and policy, when creating the required administrative structures to ensure that the right is respected, protected, and fulfilled for all.

The Issue is divided into six parts, each focusing on a specific theme of right to education policy and practice. The first part includes an article written by RTE staff on The Role of Court Decisions in the Realisation of the Right to Education, which draws on RTE's background paper on accountability for the GEM Report 2017-8.

 

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In this report, the Special Rapporteur looks with concern at the rapid increase in the number of private education providers and the resulting commercialization of education, and examines the negative effects of this on the norms and principles underlying the legal framework of the right to education as established by international human rights treaties. He highlights the repercussions of privatization on the principles of social justice and equity and analyses education laws as well as evolving jurisprudence related to privatization in education.

Finally, he offers a set of recommendations on developing effective regulatory frameworks for controlling private providers of education and safeguarding education as a public good.

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Dans ce rapport, le Rapporteur spécial note avec préoccupation la multiplication rapide du nombre d’établissements d’enseignement privés et la commercialisation de l’éducation qui en découle. Il examine les effets néfastes de cette tendance sur les normes et principes qui constituent le fondement du cadre juridique du droit à l’éducation tel qu’il est consacré par les instruments internationaux relatifs aux droits de l’homme. Il met en évidence les répercussions de la privatisation sur les principes de justice sociale et d’équité et analyse la législatio n relative à l’éducation ainsi que l’évolution de la jurisprudence se rapportant à la privatisation de l’éducation.

Enfin, le Rapporteur spécial formule une série de recommandations concernant l’élaboration de cadres réglementaires efficaces permettant de soumettre les établissements d’enseignement privés à un contrôle et de faire en sorte que l’éducation demeure un bien public.

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En este informe, el Relator Especial observa con preocupación el rápido aumento del número de proveedores de enseñanza privados y la resultante comercialización de la educación, y examina los efectos negativos de este fenómeno en las normas y los principios que subyacen al marco jurídico del derecho a la educación, establecidos en los tratados internacionales de derechos humanos. El Relator Especial pone de relieve las repercusiones de la privatización en los principios de justicia social y equidad y analiza leyes de educación, así como la evolución de la jurisprudencia en lo referente a la privatización de la educación.
 
Por último, formula una serie de recomendaciones sobre la elaboración de marcos reguladores eficaces para controlar a los proveedores de enseñanza privados y salvaguardar la educación como un bien público.
 
 
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This report examines public-private partnerships in education, which are inextricably linked to rapidly expanding privatization. The Special Rapporteur highlights their implications for the right to education and for the principles of social justice and equity. Lastly, he offers a set of recommendations with a view to developing an effective regulatory framework, along with implementation strategies for public-private partnerships in education, in keeping with State obligations for the right to education, as laid down in international human rights conventions, and the need to safeguard education as a public good.

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Ce rapport examine les partenariats public-privé dans le domaine de l’éducation, indissociables de l’expansion rapide de la privatisation. Le Rapporteur Spécial souligne ainsi leurs incidences sur le droit à l’éducation et les principes de justice sociale et d’équité. Enfin, il propose une série de recommandations en vue d’élaborer un cadre réglementaire efficace, ainsi que des stratégies pour la mise en œuvre de partenariats public-privé dans le domaine de l’éducation, conformément aux obligations qui incombent aux États concernant le droit à l’éducation, énoncées dans les instruments internationaux relatifs aux droits de l’homme, et eu égard à la nécessité de protéger l’éducation en tant que bien public.

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En este informe, el Relator Especial examina las alianzas público-privadas relativas a la educación, que están ligadas indisolublemente al rápido avance de la privatización. Pone de relieve sus repercusiones en el derecho a la educación y los principios de justicia social y equidad. Por último, formula una serie de recomendaciones con miras a elaborar un marco normativo eficaz y unas estrategias de ejecución de las alianzas público-privadas en el ámbito de la educación, en cumplimiento de las obligaciones de los Estados relativas al derecho a la educación, conforme a lo establecido en las convenciones y convenios internacionales de derechos humanos, y la necesidad de salvaguardar la educación como un bien público.

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