Right to education handbook

Education is a fundamental human right of every woman, man and child. In states’ efforts to meet their commitments to making the right to education a reality for all, most have made impressive progress in recent decades. With new laws and policies that remove fees in basic education, significant progress has been made in advancing free education. This has led to tens of millions of children enrolling for the first time and the number of out of school children and adolescents falling by almost half since 2000.

Guide to a strategic approach to human rights education

How national human rights institutions (NHRIs) can benefit from their unique position and set winning priorities. The guide aims to support NHRIs in adopting a strategic approach to human rights education based on guided exercises and reflections on the specific contexts of NHRIs, the challenges they meet and the unique role and responsibilities of NHRIs in the field of human rights education. The guide also suggests common standards for NHRIs work on human rights education.

 

Learning lessons from litigators: Realising the right to education through public interest lawyering (Module 1)

The Oxford Human Rights Hub in partnership with the Open Society Foundations has created a free online resource Learning lessons from litigators: Realising the right to education through public interest lawyering for anyone engaged in campaigning, advocating or litigating for the right to education, especially in the context of privatisation of education, on the potential and risks of litigation and how it can complement other forms of activism.

Using the law for children's rights: An introductory guide

Using the law for children's rights: an introductory guide

While many authorities can tolerate some traditional campaigning methods, it is usually harder to ignore the law. As part of broader campaigns, the law can be a powerful tool for achieving the changes that children need. Legal advocacy is now being used systematically in a few countries – leading to strong outcomes for children – and it has great potential for wider use.

Key proposals regarding the follow-up on views issued by UN human rights treaty bodies

The Strategic Litigation Working Group (SLWG) has launched a discussion paper with eight key proposals regarding the follow-up on views issued by United Nations human rights treaty bodies (UNTBs). ESCR-Net’s SLWG recognises the significance of decisions issued by UNTBs under the complaints procedures (Views) in the advancement of human rights enjoyment by people around the world, and welcomes the past action and willingness of the UNTBs to continue developing constructive practices regarding the impact and implementation of such Views.

Guide: Unpacking Sustainable Development Goal 4 Education 2030

This guide, organised around a set of questions and answers to 'unpack' SDG4, provides overall guidance for a deeper understanding of SDG4 within the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in order to support its effective implementation. The guide outlines the key features of SDG4-Education 2030 and the global commitments expressed in the SDG4 targets as articulated in the Incheon Declaration and the Education 2030 Framework for Action. The guide also examines the implications of translating these global commitments within, and through, national education development efforts.

Guide to: Human rights guiding principles on state obligations regarding private schools

The Human rights guiding principles on state obligations regarding private schools ('Guiding Principles') intend to provide a universally accepted and legally binding normative framework that will help reflect on the role and limitations of private schools with a view to guaranteeing human dignity. 

This guide explains why the Guiding Principles are needed, who they are being developed by and the consultation process.

Financing Matters: A toolkit on domestic financing for education

This toolkit has been produced by the Global Campaign for Education (GCE) in collaboration with ActionAid International (AAI) and Education International (EI), and with funding from the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). It aims to support civil society organisations and education activists across low- and middle-income countries to advocate and campaign on issues related to financing for education, as a strategic focus area of the GCE movement.

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