The aim of this manual is to provide an easily-referenced, one-stop guide to rights-based education by explaining international human rights documents while drawing on numerous country-specific examples. It presents the key human rights as they relate to children, parents and governments, and the corresponding obligations, especially of governments, that must be met to fulfil those rights, while summarising and analysing the major human rights treaties and conventions from the perspective of education. The manual is intended as a reference tool for policy-makers and practitioners in education.

The goal of a human rights-based approach to education is to ensure every child a quality education that respects and promotes her or his right to dignity and optimum development. This publication provides a comprehensive framework of strategies and actions necessary to translate children’s right to education and rights within education into legislation, policies and programmes for the attainment of Education for All.

This toolkit aims to help education activists reinforce their advocacy and campaign work on education financing. It aims to give practical information in an accessible form, together with ideas for how to build an effective national campaign – the evidence you can build and the tactics you can deploy. 

It focuses on holding national governments, particularly Ministries of Finance, to account, challenging them when they are internalising ideological positions pushed by external actors. The toolkit is addressed to national coalitions, teacher unions, NGOs and others, to deal with strategic issues around education financing so that more money flows more effectively into education systems and more children can learn in good quality public schools. 

This is a 28-page booklet setting out a process for using a human rights framework to assess a government’s education budget.  The booklet looks at elements of the right to education and where these might be found in a government’s budget; a government’s human rights obligations and questions these raise about a government’s budget; a process for using a rights framework to analyse a government’s education budget; and a short discussion of costing related to the right to education.

 

This guide provides civil society organisations (CSOs) in the education sector with the basic information they need to get started on budget work. It introduces core concepts relating to budgets, and discusses ways of analysing them. It also demonstrates how budget work can inform strategic advocacy messages, and bring about change in the education sector.

This booklet articulates what it means to take an explicitly rights-based approach to government budgets and draws on the lessons of Gender Budget Initiative experiences around the world. It links govern­ments’ commitments under CEDAW with the four main dimen­sions of budgets: revenue, expenditure, macroeconomics of the budget, and budget decision-making processes. It shows links between the share of educational expenditure and the realisation of girls’ right to education.

 

This guide offers practical ideas for including children and young people with disabilities in education before, during or after a crisis. It outlines some of the common challenges that children and young people with disabilities might face with education in or after an emergency. It also discusses some constraints or concerns that teachers might have with supporting their learning in these circumstances. The guide offers practical ways in which teachers can tackle these issues and welcome learners with disabilities into their classes.

This manual provides guidance to national authorities seeking to prepare and enact domestic legislation and policies addressing internal displacement in their country.

Chapter 15 is about the protection of education during and after displacement.

Commentary explaining the scope and content of the right to education (Article 14) in the EU Charter. Includes detailed sections on the main aspects of Article 14 including: non-discrimination in access to education, right of access to education, possibility of compulsory free education, freedom to found educational establishments and respect of parents' convictions.

This guide to the right to education provisions in the European Social Charter focuses on free primary and secondary education, vocational training and higher education, and the education of children with disabilities.

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