This is a 28-page booklet setting out a process for using a human rights framework to assess a government’s education budget.  The booklet looks at elements of the right to education and where these might be found in a government’s budget; a government’s human rights obligations and questions these raise about a government’s budget; a process for using a rights framework to analyse a government’s education budget; and a short discussion of costing related to the right to education.

 

This report explores a range of innovative education budget work initiatives from Bangladesh, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Uganda, where civil society has monitored and challenged their governments over education expenditure in order to hold themaccountable for commitments to EFA and the MDGs. It examines the significance and impact of civil society budget initiatives by drawing on interviews and focus group discussions with a range of education stakeholders, including education coalitions, government officials, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), teaching staff and school pupils; and by reviewing research reports and budget manuals developed by civil society organisations (CSOs).

This booklet articulates what it means to take an explicitly rights-based approach to government budgets and draws on the lessons of Gender Budget Initiative experiences around the world. It links govern­ments’ commitments under CEDAW with the four main dimen­sions of budgets: revenue, expenditure, macroeconomics of the budget, and budget decision-making processes. It shows links between the share of educational expenditure and the realisation of girls’ right to education.

 

A primary objective of this report is to provide an overview of and compare the monitoring mechanisms of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the recent UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) from a child rights perspective and how CSOs can best use these mechanisms. This is reflected in Part 1 of the report.


A secondary objective is to provide an overview of the regional human rights/ child rights mechanisms and how Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) can use them for advancing Children’s Rights. Part 2 presents such an overview.


The report offers conclusions on the Child Rights impact of the CRC mechanisms, the UPR and the regional mechanisms.

This publication is intended to support everybody that works in the basic education field in South Africa. It aims to provide a common legally grounded planning, monitoring and advocacy framework that is child-centred and recognises the interconnectedness of human rights.

The right to education in international human rights law is contained in number of international treaties. The most comprehensive coverage of the right is found within the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) under articles 13 and 14. The primary level of education is an essential and integral phase in the development of a child, without the right to education children are unable to realize other rights. This research assesses the functionality of the Egyptian primary education system and its compliance with the international human rights standards of education, specifically the utilizing the 4-A schematic. The indicators included in the 4-A system are defined and analyzed in accordance to the primary level of education. A brief modern history of the Egyptian education system is provided in order to understand current trends. The issues facing the Ministry of Education â are centralization, aid for education and social and economic gaps â and their analysis provides greater insight into the compliance of the state. The final section of this research measures and analyzes the Egyptian system with the international standards in direct correlation to the human rights indicators that comprise the 4-A schematic. There are pockets of defacto discrimination, mostly social-economic that exists within the Egyptian primary education system and by international standards these facets of discrimination should take the highest priority for reform for the Ministry of Education. Other elements detracting from the provision of the right to education includes the quality of education in Egypt and equality. Stronger educational policies that are sharply focused, with targets for implementation being set; comprehensive legislation; and greater levels of awareness and civic engagement are needed in order to protect the right to education at the primary education level.

Nearly fifteen years ago, Audrey Chapman emphasised the importance of ascertaining violations of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) as a means to enhance its enforcement. Today, this violations approach is even more salient given the recent adoption of the Optional Protocol to the ICESCR. Indicators are important to enforcing economic, social, and cultural rights because they assist in measuring progressive realisation. This article focuses on the right to education in the ICESCR to illustrate how indicators can be employed to ascertain treaty compliance and violations. The methodology that we propose calls for: 1) analysing the specific language of the treaty that pertains to the right in question; 2) defining the concept and scope of the right; 3) identifying appropriate indicators that correlate with state obligations; 4) setting benchmarks to measure progressive realisation; and 5) clearly identifying violations of the right in question.

This guide presents ideas and methodologies to put a human rights-based approach to education in practice. It focuses on six strategic areas that are central to (and provide a framework for) a HRBA to education including: understanding and securing the right to education working with excluded groups; financing education; promoting citizen participation in education securing rights in education; advancing a full "Education for All" agenda. Each section begins with a brief overview of key issues to be considered and then discusses a range of activities which could be developed within a scheme of work. Short practical examples are given, from a wide range of countries. The majority of the activities focus on work at the local level, but national and international links are also discussed. Within each section two or three areas are analysed in more detail.

Spanish

Le bureau de la CVPD Kinshasa s’est donné pour mission la défense et la promotion des droits économique socio culturel parmi lesquels le droit à l’éducation. Ce rapport présente les résultats du suivi de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l'éducation dans la province éducationnelle de Kin-Ouest. Il porte sur les aspects des Infrastructures, Formation des élèves et Recyclage des enseignants, l’Accessibilité par les enfants à l’école, la Participation à la gestion de l’école par les élèves et la Rémunération des enseignants. Apres cinq mois d’enquête, la CVPD a relevé beaucoup de violation de droits à l’éducation scolaire sur le plan de la gratuité de l’enseignement primaire, sur le plan de l’accessibilité à l’école pour les enfants pauvres et sur le plan de l’obligation de l’Etat qui ne fournit aucun effort pour rendre cette formation primaire élémentaire gratuite. La CVPD a aussi remarqué que les enseignants sont sous payés (parfois 12000 Fc soit presque 13$ américain) et que le monnayage de tous les services à l’école est devenu normal. La prédation est aussi relevée dans les chefs des promoteurs des écoles privées, les gestionnaires des écoles de l’Etat et les inspecteurs sensés contrôler le bon fonctionnement de ces écoles. Les infrastructures comme les bâtiments contenants les salles de classe sont vétustes dans la plus part des cas, que ce soit dans les écoles publiques ou privées. Les bibliothèques n’existent plus, l’espace de recréation existe pour les écoles publiques de l’Etat, écoles catholiques et protestantes et non dans les écoles privées où souvent l’école est dans l’enceinte où se trouvent d’autres locateurs. La CVPD salue l’initiative du gouvernement et l'encourage dans son initiative de construction de mille écoles sur toute l’étendue de la république. A Kinshasa, cela a amélioré tant soit peu l’accessibilité et le confort des élèves dans ces écoles nouvellement construites. La CVPD a aussi constaté et remarqué pendant ses enquêtes une augmentation des élèves filles dans toutes les écoles visitées. La moyenne par école est presque arrivée à 65% des filles contre 35% des garçons.

These Guidelines were developed to assist countries wishing to assess the compatibility of their national education laws and policies with international standards. The booklet aims to provide guidance on national education legal and policy frameworks.

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