La société civile francophone se mobilise contre la marchandisation de l’éducation dans le monde

Communiqué de presse

Paris, 9 Mars 2016

A l’occasion de la Semaine de la langue française et de la Francophonie, une coalition d’organisations francophones de la société civile[1] se mobilise contre la marchandisation de l’éducation, le 15 mars 2016, au siège de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF).

World Bank accepts complaint on its investment in Bridge International Academies

*Press release*

(Nairobi/Washington, DC, 7 June 2018). Human rights organisations welcomed the decision by the World Bank’s Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) to accept a complaint regarding the International Finance Corporation (IFC)’s investment in Bridge International Academies (Bridge) in Kenya. The company operates over 400 so-called low-cost primary schools in Kenya that have been the focus of a complaint by Kenyan citizens, which raises concerns about violations of World Bank investment standards as well as national and international laws.

Le réseau francophone contre la marchandisation de l’éducation recrute un.e chargé.e de développement de réseau basé à Dakar

Le réseau francophone contre la marchandisation de l’éducation recrute un.e chargé.e de développement de réseau basé à Dakar.

Fonctions : Coordination, communication/campaigning, étude, recherche.

Localisation géographique :  Le poste sera hébergé à la COSYDEP à Dakar, Deux Voies Liberté 6, Rond-point JVC, Sicap Liberté 6, villa 6039.

Unesco GEM report 2018 gender review launch

On 8 March 2018, to coincide with International Women’s Day, the Unesco GEM Report team held the worldwide launch of their 2018 Gender Review.

The main finding of the report is that only 44% of states have made a full, legal commitment, via international treaties, to achieving gender equality in education. The report also analyses the slow progress towards gender parity in education and how this can be addressed.

A separate but equal classroom?: The Indian desegregation

‘In the field of public education, the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.'

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court made the above declaration in the case of Brown v Board of Education of Topeka, and found that segregated schooling on the basis of race was unconstitutional. Nearly six decades later, the view remains equally significant in light of a different basis of segregation: that of children with disabilities.

Date: 
8 March 2018

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